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Winning Chess Moves: Bronstein vs Geller, 1961

There have been many great chess players over the years, but only a small percentage of them manage to captivate the public imagination and receive considerable mainstream attention at any given time. David Bronstein never became a world champion, but there’s no denying that at the height of his career, he frequently captivated imaginations whileContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Bronstein vs Geller, 1961”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58

When you think about it, our whole life is about solving puzzles. Chess problems are similar to life problems in that solving the puzzle requires careful thought and that through practice, we can improve our ability to quickly find the best solution. So enjoy our daily chess puzzles and smile knowing that by doing soContinue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 135

Emmanuel Lasker offered the famous advice, “When you see a good move, look for a better one.” Today’s position easily lends itself to this exercise in chess thought. First, find the obvious good move. Then, try and find the best continuation.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 134

White to move and mate in 5 (from Yuri Averbakh vs. Alexander Kazimirovich Tolush, 1963).

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133

Tonight I finished a long day of teaching chess by presenting an absolutely superb mating combination played by the first World Chess Champion. A brilliant positional player, particularly in his later years, Wilhelm Steinitz rose to prominence in the mid-nineteenth century as a dangerous attacker in the romantic style of chess that had been popularisedContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133”

Great Chess On Display During The Practice Event for The Eade Foundation’s Spring Scholastic Chess Classic

It’s especially inspiring to witness great chess moves in scholastic tournaments. As a scholastic chess coach and tournament director, seeing young minds play brilliantly is really what it’s all about. Today, while running a practice event for The Eade Foundation’s Spring Scholastic Chess Classic, Jay Stallings and I were treated to some spectacular chess. Really,Continue reading “Great Chess On Display During The Practice Event for The Eade Foundation’s Spring Scholastic Chess Classic”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 132

In my last post, I challenged the reader to solve a mate in two which required truly understanding basic move possibilities in order to be solved. Returning to puzzles that test our mastery of the basics is a great way to learn how to play the game at a higher level and especially so whenContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 132”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 131

Similar to how military units such as armour, artillery and cavalry have their own unique roles, each piece in the game of chess has unique movements. In order to solve this mate in 2, you must first truly understand how the pieces can move.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 130

Some of the most brilliant chess puzzles involve material sacrifice for the sake of the mate. Here however, the sacrifice is not merely needed to mate but in fact to avoid loss. One wrong move, and the outcome is completely out of your hands.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 129

Part of the beauty of chess is that no one can predict the level of greatness which the two participants might create in any given game. You may not have heard much about the chess game played between Kekhayov and Petrov in 1964 but the magnificent mating combination at the end is definitely noteworthy. ThisContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 129”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 128

As chess players, we should always be trying to make improvements in our technique. For example, the player playing white in the position below should be able use good technique to win easily. Good technique may be good enough to win this endgame but with perfect technique white can checkmate in just four moves! SoContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 128”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 127

Oftentimes, an introduction to a specific situation that requires deep thought is just the inspiration we need to spark new developments in our chess ability. Here is a mate in two by Александр Ажусин that a student of mine found immensely satisfying to solve. Enjoy…

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 56

An equally ingenious and absurd chess puzzle by William L. Barclay from Chess Life and Review. White to move and mate in 2 (William L. Barclay, Chess Life and Review, 1972.)

So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 41

Here’s a fun tactic from a training game I played against a student last Wednesday. What is white’s winning idea?

Winning Chess Moves: Aronian vs Gelfand, 2008

Can you spot Grandmaster Levon Aronian’s winning chess move from his victory over Grandmaster Boris Gelfand at the 2008 FIDE Grand Prix in Sochi, Russia? White to move and win!

#Chess Position Worth Sharing! 125

Today’s position is a practical tactical shot from the game GM Vladislav Artemiev vs GM Vladislav Kovalev at the Tata Steel Masters in Wijk aan Zee played on 1/14/2020. Black has just played Rd8 for his 39th move. What is white’s Best continuation?

#Chess Position Worth Sharing! 124

Tonight’s position comes from a 1966 game played between Sven Johannessen (White) vs Bobby Fischer (Black) in Havana, Cuba. Johannessen has just played 26. Nf4. What did Bobby Fischer play here?