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Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 70

Today’s puzzle of interest is a mate in 2 with many carefully placed ingredients. I was struck by this chess problem’s modern design and surprised by the fact that it was composed over a century ago in 1920. Not only is this chess puzzle a beautiful reminder of how much is possible on the chessboardContinue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 70”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 69

My Facebook friend Michael Pasman recently became a World Champion. More specifically, Michael won first place and thus the gold medal for the Studies category in the 10th FIDE World Cup in Composing. Michael Pasman is well known in the chess puzzle community for his compositional knowledge, creativity and his high output of outstanding studies.Continue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 69”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 67

When well composed, mate in 2 chess problems are highly enjoyable which is why I share so many of these gems with the Daily Chess Musings community. Tonight’s puzzle was definitely well composed and although I had never heard of Gyula Andre before, I now have a deep respect for his talent as a composer.

Chess Position Worth Sharing 147!

Spent 27 minutes of my time this evening working out the solution to this beautiful endgame puzzle by Leonid Kubbel. It was time we’ll spent! For those who are unfamiliar with Kubbel’s work, he composed many of the finest endgame studies of the early part of the twentieth century. In fact, Kubbel likely could haveContinue reading “Chess Position Worth Sharing 147!”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 66

Some of my favorite endgame studies have the reader playing from a disadvantage with the goal being a draw. In tonight’s puzzle, White is down to a single bishop versus Black’s four pawns but still can draw with perfect play. Enjoy…

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 65

Some mate-in-3 compositions are much trickier than others. This particular chess puzzle by Erich Ernest Zepler is diabolical!

A Question for Chess Composers?

My question to fellow chess composers is, “What is the preferred method of determining whether a chess composition is unique or if the composer has unintentionally duplicated someone else’s creation?“ As an example, I am including a position I recently composed to test my students at the Fremont Summer Chess Camp. As far as IContinue reading “A Question for Chess Composers?”