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Winning Chess Moves: Carlsen vs Tallaksen Ostmoe, 7/05/2005

Chess is booming in popularity and one of the reasons why is our current world champion Magnus Carlsen. Carlsen regularly produces stunning works of chess art that’ll make you want to play chess. Of course, Magnus’ primary goal in every chess game is winning. However, the very best chess players in history have a wayContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Carlsen vs Tallaksen Ostmoe, 7/05/2005”

Winning Chess Moves: Borisenko-Belova vs Nakhimovskaya, 1968

During her illustrious career, WGM Valentina M Borisenko-Belova (1/28/1920-3/6/1993) won the Women’s Soviet Championship five times (a record she shares with Nona Gaprindashvili.) Zara Nakhimovskaya was a formidable chess player who won the Latvian Chess Championship for Women four times. In our feature position, Valentina M Borisenko-Belova is playing with the white pieces against ZaraContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Borisenko-Belova vs Nakhimovskaya, 1968”

Winning Chess Moves: Mieses vs Von Bardeleben, 1905

Curt von Bardeleben was a most interesting chess personality and managed to lose in some of the most beautiful ways possible. Of course, many students of chess are quite familiar with the triumph Wilhelm Steinitz played over Curt Carl Alfred von Bardeleben at Hastings in 1895, but also of note is Jacques Mieses exciting victoryContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Mieses vs Von Bardeleben, 1905”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133

Tonight I finished a long day of teaching chess by presenting an absolutely superb mating combination played by the first World Chess Champion. A brilliant positional player, particularly in his later years, Wilhelm Steinitz rose to prominence in the mid-nineteenth century as a dangerous attacker in the romantic style of chess that had been popularisedContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 130

Some of the most brilliant chess puzzles involve material sacrifice for the sake of the mate. Here however, the sacrifice is not merely needed to mate but in fact to avoid loss. One wrong move, and the outcome is completely out of your hands.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 129

Part of the beauty of chess is that no one can predict the level of greatness which the two participants might create in any given game. You may not have heard much about the chess game played between Kekhayov and Petrov in 1964 but the magnificent mating combination at the end is definitely noteworthy. ThisContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 129”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 128

As chess players, we should always be trying to make improvements in our technique. For example, the player playing white in the position below should be able use good technique to win easily. Good technique may be good enough to win this endgame but with perfect technique white can checkmate in just four moves! SoContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 128”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 43

Today I share a beautiful endgame study/mate-in-4 that I have come across in a couple of books. Carel Christiaan Wilhelm Mann has placed black in zugzwang (1…f5 2.Qh4# or 1…Kf5 2.Qd5#) but has white to move. The resulting solution is sure to entertain!