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Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58

When you think about it, our whole life is about solving puzzles. Chess problems are similar to life problems in that solving the puzzle requires careful thought and that through practice, we can improve our ability to quickly find the best solution. So enjoy our daily chess puzzles and smile knowing that by doing soContinue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 132

In my last post, I challenged the reader to solve a mate in two which required truly understanding basic move possibilities in order to be solved. Returning to puzzles that test our mastery of the basics is a great way to learn how to play the game at a higher level and especially so whenContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 132”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 131

Similar to how military units such as armour, artillery and cavalry have their own unique roles, each piece in the game of chess has unique movements. In order to solve this mate in 2, you must first truly understand how the pieces can move.

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 57

This particular mate in two managed to confound me for a couple of hours. I am sure if you give it a shot, you will soon see why!

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 127

Oftentimes, an introduction to a specific situation that requires deep thought is just the inspiration we need to spark new developments in our chess ability. Here is a mate in two by Александр Ажусин that a student of mine found immensely satisfying to solve. Enjoy…

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 56

An equally ingenious and absurd chess puzzle by William L. Barclay from Chess Life and Review. White to move and mate in 2 (William L. Barclay, Chess Life and Review, 1972.)

So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 27

Probably my favorite finishing mate of the year! My opponent has just captured my rook on f1 with his bishop. White to move and mate in 2. (Not too hard to spot but very satisfying play!)

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 32

White to move and mate in 2(Michail Aktschurin, 1982). Stumped? Perhaps you would benefit from a free introductory lesson ($40 value) with Chris Torres on Wyzant. Claim your free lesson today. Just use Coach Chris’ link: https://is.gd/u5bIVd