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2020-2021 FIDE Candidates Tournament: Who Are You Rooting For?

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THE FIDE CANDIDATES’ TOURNAMENT RESUMES IN JUST 4 DAYS

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Chess Think

If a picture can be worth a thousand words than I suppose it’s justifiable that I used two YouTube videos to explain a single chess position. These two episodes are part of a series dedicated to describing thought processes that will lead you to making better decisions during your chess games.

 

Black to move (Hermanis Karlovich Mattison vs Vladimir Vukovic, Debrecen 1925).

Episode One and Two of Chess Think feature a single position from move 20 of the 1925 game between Hermanis Karlovich Mattison and Vladimir Vukovic. In episode one, we visualize a candidate move for black and then analyze all of the checks, captures and threats white can respond with. I consider to be the best thought process to avoid playing tactically unsound moves including the very tempting capture featured in episode One. In Episode Two, we use the checks, captures and threats method to locate a new candidate move and then to determine if our new move is winning.

Together, the first two videos of Chess Think launch an important series dedicated to the thought processes needed to excel in chess. If you are serious about improving at chess, start using the checks, captures and threats method of analysis described thoroughly in the two videos below. This method takes time and effort but the payoff is that you will immediately play better chess.

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Chess Chat: Q&A with Lauren Goodkind, Chess Educator Extraordinaire

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The Eade Foundation’s Spring Scholastic Chess Classic

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#Chess Position Worth Sharing 129

Part of the beauty of chess is that no one can predict the level of greatness which the two participants might create in any given game. You may not have heard much about the chess game played between Kekhayov and Petrov in 1964 but the magnificent mating combination at the end is definitely noteworthy. This game represents a master stroke of a relatively unknown chess player who, by every measure, created a timeless mate in four.

White to move and mate in four (Kekhayov – Petrov, Bulgaria, 1964).

Weekly Tournament Results March 26, 2021

Friday Frenzy

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Super Saturday Swiss

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Beginner Brunch

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 128

As chess players, we should always be trying to make improvements in our technique. For example, the player playing white in the position below should be able use good technique to win easily. Good technique may be good enough to win this endgame but with perfect technique white can checkmate in just four moves! So I challenge you to improve your technique by finding the perfect continuation for white.

White to move mate in 4 (puzzle by Валерий Резинкин from Задачи и этюды-48).

The Importance of Setting Lofty Goals in Chess

One of my most successful coaching techniques is encouraging my chess students to set lofty goals for themselves. Together we break these goals into attainable steps and utilize achievement markers to show progress. Of course, certain levels of chess expertise are not achievable for everyone and if they were, chess would be obsolete. For instance, if everyone was a grandmaster at chess, no one would be a grandmaster at chess. That being said, there are goals which get incorrectly deemed unrealistic and are worthy of further pursuit.

An excavator operator has the lofty goal of freeing a large barge from the shore.

Regardless if a lofty chess goal can be achieved, the belief that it can be forces students to address their assumptions of what can’t be accomplished. This realization is where I believe the most valuable chess lessons are hidden. The lessons which teach us how to overcome adversity but also learn to accept our own limitations. In fact, a Harvard Business Study found that the 3% of their MBA graduates who wrote their goals down, went on to earn ten times as much as the other 97% combined!

So I ask the Daily Chess Musings Community, which lofty chess goal can you set right now? Write it in the comments. Just by posting your goal, you will be moving closer to success!

Balancing Effective Outcomes With Efficient Results

Chess players regularly differentiate between effective outcomes and efficient results; the former means “having the desired effect,” while the latter means “having a desired effect in the fewest moves or timeframe.” Chess puzzles often require us to be more efficient in moves than effectively necessary while performance ratings only measure the effectiveness of our moves while efficiency isn’t measured. A group of masters could effectively produce a brilliant chess game if given enough time to discuss the moves thoroughly like in a correspondence chess match. However, that same group of players would lose badly employing a team strategy in a bullet chess game because openly discussing moves wouldn’t be efficient enough.

Recently I have been working very effectively on several very exciting chess related projects. However, because these projects involve collaborating with other esteemed chess professionals, my daily video output has temporarily dropped. Because I worry that posting less regularly may adversely effect some Daily Chess Musings club members enthusiasm, I wanted to publicly address the situation. Rest assured that my efforts during this brief time of lower content efficiency will result in our Daily Chess Musings community becoming overall more effective.

Weekly Tournament Results March 19, 2021

Friday Frenzy

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Super Saturday Swiss

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Beginner Brunch

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Chess Club Points Session 2, 2021

Name/ Chess.comPoints
Glynnton Buckley250
Ethan Mei chessfor105212
Estella Mei148
Karthik Subramanian winnerkarthik07130
Sebastien Mei chessfor107119
Andrew306095
krithik_r94
Ethanleeethanlee81
Ea218175
louis94871
Justin Zhao67
Ea2004567
aruminchess66
Lorenzo Blackston64
CautiousAgent60
diced_knights57
NivedhP57
Isabella Jamka Bella032355
cool_chess_kid53
VibrantDiamond10047
Kipling Song46
Peregrine10445
voldemort09345
Jet Lew44
KevinKim1944
QueenBunny140
Hellocow39
Stanleyqiu41839
denmerc34
Andrew Garcia33
nervousokra33
Sammongpu33
CoolBestChampion31
Andrew Carter30
Bshreeansh30
arnavbhosale129
TheKidsKid29
chessdude97028
Red90028
Adil Khan25
B1ad3z25
sazhagianambi25
VedantbhatiaGM25
Timofei Oshurkov24
chaas217824
ThunderingKavin24
DrakonWarrior23
Rohitsaich23
dkarva22
XiaoMoMo22
Vineel Uppada20
aonofre041620
AnElliott19
MATHROCKSLJT19
Nitikach18
ppillari18
Amanekitty17
hummingbird0917
kabibblet17
King99998317
DearShowyCircus16
Jonofre1016
LavendarLlama15
RedCharmingRoad15
Sunmay1215
toby dy14
Subiksha Shri Palanisamy Mythili14
arushi271814
firstorange214
luckylol314
Naren Raghavan13
annieg00113
Jojoofthejungle13
Jollification13
kidchess4613
prajitmani13
rgallege13
AadhityaRavikiran2312
ChessMusher12
Vihaan pandit11
Rishi Bhartiya11
aditya465111
Amazingmove411
Bootramp11
CastawayWill11
Dark_Knight_DK1411
Hwinner11
LegoChessBuddy11
lukelegendwalker11
McnChess9911
MegaWildBalloon11
Nikhil1232111
owlsnchess11
PlayMercenary11
Shuvam Dutta10
Arumin Ravisankar10
Kedar Kanade10
Kaylee Yon10
Josiah Bovey10
nilesbulldog1410
Kunal tayde10
Alecliu1210
av291610
Davidluvchess10
merryargyle10
Abenzer Wordofa9
Ian Belov9
Kyle Goodpaster9
Thaarak Sriram9
20m6D0m69
bwashie9
JONATHAN_ANONUEVO9
kalleblanka9
knightseu9
marcusahn9
ritztoday9
soumik_maji9
1Nf3108
Daiwen18
hikaru2318
jakea00278
maverickfrench8
Oceanwaves1008
ryan_pt8
TacticalFightingQuin8
Gutaga Love7
James Prodouz7
Eayon Hsu7
Andrewluvchess7
GeniusHuskies7
Kakker1237
louaj7
lucasahn7
sarithapotula7
Sengupta177
alexchicken6
Chessllamallamallama6
Erene Anastopoulos6
Herman Chen6
KMudambi6
NinjaNithin6
NoSignOfTheta6
Belen Wordofa5
anandchess305
earabian5
HangLe1245
KavinFunChess5
KKeshav645
PinkUnicorn1005
raider20245
SunlightForever5
TopStrongGem5
Aidan Reese4
Khan Sakeeb4
Theodore Murgulet4
AxelNYCFC4
bronzelegs4
junioriv21064
Moukthika_Mighty4
nandanj6444
Anika Kaul3
Arushi Maheshwari3
Amogh Chauhan3
Eadburt3
geethau3
mercatorproject3
shuvamdutta2183
Vihaan2320113
Alex W2
Grace20122
HotDogHD2
isenbr2
lm4o2
Rogelioisrael2
sailfish652
kstao171
KyletheHuman1

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 127

Oftentimes, an introduction to a specific situation that requires deep thought is just the inspiration we need to spark new developments in our chess ability. Here is a mate in two by Александр Ажусин that a student of mine found immensely satisfying to solve. Enjoy…

White to move and mate in 2 (Александр Ажусин from the magazine 64, 1971.)

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 56

An equally ingenious and absurd chess puzzle by William L. Barclay from Chess Life and Review. White to move and mate in 2 (William L. Barclay, Chess Life and Review, 1972.)

White to move and mate in 2 (William L. Barclay, Chess Life and Review, 1972.)

The Best Chess Analysis

Chess games are a lot like feature movies. For instance, the chess moves can be thought of as the dialogue, strategic themes are the plot, and tactics are the fight scenes. Sometimes endgames are the final battle and other times just an epilogue. The average movie goer, much like an amateur chess player, often catch the main points but miss many important subtleties. Having an experienced chess coach review your chess games in detail, is akin to watching a movie with a good friend who is an expert in the history of film, who is capable of analyzing more than just plot and dialogue but also all of the cinematic subtleties such as lighting, camera angle, editing, microphone placement, etc.) Students who submit their games to me for review not only receive a synopsis of the main themes but also learn to understand the subtleties that 97% of chess players never even notice.

Note: Only games submitted in standard pgn format will be accepted for analysis. Games will be returned in pgn format with annotations.

Click here to receive expert analysis of your game for just $5!

Weekly Tournament Results March 5, 2021

Friday Frenzy

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#5VibrantDiamond1003
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Super Saturday Swiss

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#1luckylol34.5
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#3CautiousAgent3
#4diced_knights3
#5nervousokra3
#6lukelegendwalker3

Beginner Brunch

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#2TheKidsKid2
#3dkarva2

Happy Birthday Bobby Fischer

Greetings Chess Players. My name is Chris Torres and this is my daily chess musing for Tuesday, March 9, 2021.

Today is March ninth and therefore it is Bobby Fischer’s birthday. Fischer, who died in 2008, would have turned 78-years-old today. 

Bobby Fischer, whom many believe to be the greatest chess player of all time, was an almost unstoppable force from 1968-1972. His dominating record during this period is unparalleled in chess history and culminated with his world championship victory against Boris Spassky. The energy and excitement he brought to the table caused American interest in chess to surge. In fact, if you know a chess master who is around 60 years of age, he or she was probably a product of the Fischer Boom. 

One of my favorite Fischer positions to show my students occurs in the 1959 between game Bobby Fischer and Ruben Shocron played in Mar del Plata, Argentina. And since it’s Bobby Fischer’s birthday, I’ll share it with you. 

For more instructive Bobby Fischer puzzles and lessons like the one I just shared, please visit DailyChessMusings.com and search for “Fischer.”

Website: https://dailychessmusings.com/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN094_thod08xSv675DlYjQ

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Email: DailyChessMusings@gmail.com

So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 41

Here’s a fun tactic from a training game I played against a student last Wednesday. What is white’s winning idea?

What is white’s winning idea?

A Learning Moment

Chess is full of opportunities to learn from mistakes. There may be no take-backs in chess and also life for that matter. But as chess players, it is critically important to be honest with ourselves when we make mistakes so that we can improve both as a player and a person. 

Yesterday I published an interview on the Daily Chess Musings Blog in which a young lady I am mentoring made an inaccuracy. Sofia Doroshenko described her greatest chess achievement as, “being the only female high school captain in Illinois.” At the time of the interview, she believed this to be the case. 

In an email today, I received the names of two other female High School chess team Captains in Illinois. There names are Aria Hoesley of the Whitney Young chess team and Shreya Mangalam of the Barrington Community High chess team. Aria has an impressive USCF rating of 2091 and Shreya rating is a whopping 2132. Both young ladies are ranked in the top ten nationally and have bright futures ahead of them. 

So, at this point we know of just a few female high school chess captains in Illinois. Obviously that number needs to grow and with talented young ladies such as Aria Hoesley, Shreya Mangalam and Sofia Doroshenko leading the way, I am sure we will see positive growth in Illinois women’s chess. 

Daily Chess Musings: Chess Chat with Sofia Doroshenko

Greetings Chess Players. My name is Chris Torres and this is my daily chess musing for Tuesday, March 2, 2021.

On The Daily Chess Musings Blog I have a running series of articles called Chess Chats where I conduct written interviews with interesting members of the chess community.

Today, I posted a new Chess Chat that is definitely worth checking out. Daily Chess Musings club member Sofia Doroshenko from Chicago is currently an 18-year-old senior in high school who plans to achieve a Woman Candidate Master title to help increase outreach in under-resourced communities and further the movement to improve chess literacy and excellence amongst women.

Trust me when I say that Sofia is definitely talented enough to pull it off. She even defeated me during my annual chess Simul on my Birthday. So because Sofia Doroshenko is an up and coming star that wants to inspire other female chess players, it is extra fitting to publish her story during Women’s History Month. To read my Chess Chat with Sofia just click on the link below.

Website: https://dailychessmusings.com/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN094_thod08xSv675DlYjQ

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DailyChessMusings

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TorresChess

Chess.com Daily Chess Musings Club on Chess.com: https://www.chess.com/club/daily-chess-musings/join 

Email: DailyChessMusings@gmail.com