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Chess Shorts on YouTube

The fast paced nature of modern life make learning chess on your time in any convenient location the preferred choice for many. This is why I started offering so many chess lessons on YouTube in the first place. However, I have noticed that vertical videos have grown in popularity thanks to smartphones and social media platforms. So it obviously makes sense for my popular Daily Chess Musings YouTube channel to also offer short form vertical video content. After considering my options for subject matter and lesson material for these chess video shorts, I believe I now have a winning strategy. In the coming days, I look forward to sharing my YouTube chess shorts with the Daily Chess Musings community. In the meantime, check out this snazzy announcement video and make sure you are subscribed to my channel so that you are the first to see this exciting new venture.

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 66

Some of my favorite endgame studies have the reader playing from a disadvantage with the goal being a draw. In tonight’s puzzle, White is down to a single bishop versus Black’s four pawns but still can draw with perfect play. Enjoy…

White to play and draw (U. Venäläinen, 1st Prize in Suomen Shakki, 1969.)

Francisco Friday for 6/3/2022

Popular with beginners who strictly follow the time honored opening principles they have been taught, The Four Knights Opening has a reputation of leading to a rather dull positional game. However, Francisco Anchondo makes a habit of taking an opening with a dull reputation and running it through a metaphoric knife sharpener until it can split hairs. The game below shows one of Francisco’s well thought out ideas for black in the Four Knights Opening that is razor sharp and battle tested.

[Event “Casual Blitz game”]

[Date “2022.03.09”]

[White “Anonymous”]

[Black “Francisco Anchondo”]

[Result “0-1”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Nc3 Bc5 5.O-O d6 6.d3 a6 7.Be3 Nd4 8.Bxd4 Bxd4

9.Nd5 c6 10.Nxf6+ Qxf6 11.c3 Ba7 12.h3 h5 13.Nh2 g5 14.Qe2 g4 15.h4 Qxh4 16.b4

g3 17.Bxf7+ Kxf7 18.Qf3+ Ke8 19.Rfd1 Qxh2+ 20.Kf1 Bg4 21.Qxg3 Qh1#

0-1

Want to learn how to attack in chess? Join San Francisco Bay Area chess coach Francisco Anchondo for live chess lessons during the Free Online Summer Chess Camps.

Chess Position Worth Sharing 146!

“Capablanca’s phenomenal move-searching algorithm in those early years, when he possessed a wonderful ability for calculating variations very rapidly, made him invincible.” – Mikhail Botvinnik

White to move mate in 3 (Jose Raul Capablanca vs Abraham Friedman, Simultaneous Exhibition in Cuernavaca, Mexico 5/1/1933.)

Girls K-12 CalChess State Championship 2022

A friendly reminder that the 2022 Girls Calchess State Championship is this Saturday (June 4th). The Berkeley Chess School does a wonderful job organizing this prestigious event and I highly recommend that all the young ladies in the Northern California chess community consider attending. All participants will be broken into sections by school grade:

Kindergarten-3rd Grade

4th Grade-6th Grade

7th Grade-12th Grade

Players will play 5 rounds (time control-G/45 with a 5 sec delay).

Round times:
10:00am, 11:45pm, 1:30pm, 3:15pm and 5:00pm, with awards at 6;45pm.

AWARDS:

Trophies to top 3 players in each grade.

Click here to find out more and to register online.

Better Notate Your Chess Games

Because, once the game is over, the King and the pawn go back in the same box.

The queen, and the bishops who serve her, will experience the same fate.

Don’t worry about the horses, they’re going away too.

Even the castles will disappear.

Better notate your game.

So when your own time at the board is over,

a record of your movements…

may remain.

Chess Position Worth Sharing 145!

Of all the chess puzzles I’ve ever enjoyed…

Many of the finest were composed by Sam Loyd.

White to move and mate in 3 (Samuel Loyd, 1887).

Blitz Chess Mondays with Lauren Goodkind 5/30

Blitz Chess Mondays with Lauren Goodkind 5/23

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 65

Some mate-in-3 compositions are much trickier than others. This particular chess puzzle by Erich Ernest Zepler is diabolical!

White to move and mate in 3 (by Erich Ernest Zepler from the January 1925 Chemnitzer Wochenschach).

Free Summer Chess Camp 2022 Registration

Last updated 5/21

Participant’s First & Last NameParticipant’s Chess.com User NameI will be participating in:
Jagur Hendersonjag12345678Camp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Roshita kommarajuRedCharming RoadCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15
Charvee SekarPawn1708Camp #3 from August 8-12
Vinubalaji GopalgohanvinuCamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Macallan Yumacallan12Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Byron LiTinyOriginalHeroCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15
Manaal SyedManaalOSyedCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Claire LiDarkCoolSuccessCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
yuchen zhouyzchess9667Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Andrew GarciaAndrew3060Camp #3 from August 8-12
Alexandra GubanovaNACamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Alexey GubanovNACamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Adhrith Sharma DuddillaWinningGam1Camp #1 from June 13-17
Kieran Chalkpred1c4mentCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Shreeansh BommojubshreeanshCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Pransh DalalpranshdalalCamp #2 from July 11-15
Saanvi BalaSaanviBCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Sahana BalaSahanaBCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Ryan EdalatiKnightRyan1latiCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Isaac LeepersparrowfootCamp #2 from July 11-15
Alston LiAli201602Camp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Iason ParaschoujasonparasCamp #2 from July 11-15
Shawn XuPPPLoverCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Laura XuILQLoverCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Navya KhannaNavyaCamp #1 from June 13-17
Liam RussoliamrussoCamp #3 from August 8-12
Shruti VittaFlatSereneSchoolCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Isabella JamkaBella0323Camp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Khushi DulimittakhushidulimittaCamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Elizabeth XiaElizabethGXCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Zhander JohnsonZJCamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Eliana JohnsonEJCamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Sahiti TangiralaChess_girlCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Aarush Katyayanawesomeguy842Camp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Daniel ZhengbeybladeCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Aarav KatyayanaaravtkCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Sparsh OjalSparshCamp #1 from June 13-17
Mubashir Tahir GhazaliMubashir TChess.comCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Cheney ZhangQueenEatingKnightCamp #2 from July 11-15
Raghav MangudiPoochi1Camp #1 from June 13-17
Saisampath uppuNACamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Ram SrivatsacoolbeamingtigerCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Aadya Rar9415Camp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Austin UezuauszooCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Aaron UezuaarongomCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Xiaoci liuGalaxydragonetCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Calvin BielickiCalvinbmxCamp #3 from August 8-12
Anishanishg_svcaCamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Woodrow BuchanangoodgreatpawnCamp #1 from June 13-17
Victoria ShiVictoriaShiCamp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Rehan GallegergallegeCamp #1 from June 13-17
Daniel Border-Roldandanielborder12Camp #2 from July 11-15
Alisa Filinan/aCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
Darshi SivakumarDarshisivakumarCamp #3 from August 8-12
Elvi PioElvinJosCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
JadenJjc080Camp #1 from June 13-17
Isabella luoGalaxydragonetCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12
advait anandagm2920Camp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15
Jacob SimpsonBballNinjaJakeCamp #1 from June 13-17, Camp #2 from July 11-15, Camp #3 from August 8-12

Francisco Friday for 5/20/2022

First debuted by Adolf Albin against Emanuel Lasker in 1893, the Albin Counter Gambit (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5) is a good surprise weapon for attacking chess players who seek to take a Queen’s Gambit player out of their prep. Decades ago, Francisco Anchondo taught a masterclass in the San Francisco Bay Area on this hyper aggressive defense for black by showing games from such attacking grandmasters as Paul Keres and Alexander Morozevich. In the game below, Francisco walks in the footsteps of these giants of our game and creates a modern classic all of his own.

[Event “Casual Blitz game”]

[Date “2022.03.06”]

[White “Anonymous”]

[Black “Francisco Anchondo”]

[Result “0-1”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 d4 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Bf4 f6 6.exf6 Nxf6 7.e3 Bb4+ 8.Nbd2 dxe3

9.Bxe3 O-O 10.Be2 Re8 11.O-O Rxe3 12.fxe3 Ng4 13.Nd4 Nxe3 14.Qb3 Nxd4 15.Qxe3

Bxd2 16.Qxd2 Nf3+

0-1

Winning Chess Moves: MVL vs. Aronian, Superbet Romania 2022

GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave round 6 game against GM Levon Aronian at the Superbet Romania chess tournament came to a sudden conclusion after MVL (white) errored with 25. Kd4. How does Grandmaster Aronian (black) punish his opponent’s careless king advance?

Black to move and win (Vachier-Lagrave – Aronian, R6 of the 2022 Superbet Romania, Bucharest).

Winning Chess Moves: Palatnik vs. Geller, 1980

Ukraine has long been a source of great chess and great chess players. As such, many famous chess games have been an all Ukrainian affair. Tonight’s winning chess move comes from one such game.

Ukrainian-American chess Grandmaster Sam Palatnik played a beautiful winning move over fellow Odessa native Grandmaster Efim Geller at the URS Team Cup in 1980.

The prelude to this winning move came when GM Geller, who was black, uncharacteristically grabbed a poisoned pawn with 13… Bxg2.
GM Palatinik responded with 14. Rg1.

GM Geller retreats his bishop to c6 and now white has a extraordinarily beautiful game winning move.

White to move and mate in 5 from Semon Palatnik vs Efim Geller, 1980 URS Team Cup in Rostov-on-Don.

For another great moment in Ukrainian chess please check out the Winter issue of The Calchess Journal.

Please consider making a donation Toya Opora to help Ukrainians affected by the war.

Blitz Chess Mondays with Lauren Goodkind 5/16

IM Invitational Norm Tournament 2022 Standings

Mission 360 and Bay Area Chess have teamed up for another IM Norm Tournament in San Jose, California. These prestigious FIDE rated tournaments give much needed opportunities for California’s rising chess stars to earn internationally recognized chess titles.

Below is the cross table after the fourth round. 

As you can see, this event is talent packed!

Opening ceremony: Saturday, May 14, 11:20 AM

Round Time (tentative) for 7-day

Round 1: Saturday, May 14, 11:30 AM

Round 2: Saturday, May 14, 5:30 PM

Round 3: Sunday, May 15, 11:30 AM

Round 4: Sunday, May 15, 5:30 PM

Round 5: Monday, May 16, 6:00 PM

Round 6: Tuesday, May 17, 6:00 PM

Round 7: Wednesday, May 18, 6:00 PM

Round 8: Thursday, May 19, 10:30AM

Round 9: Friday, May 20, 6:00 PM

Find out more about these and other FIDE rated events in Northern California by visiting the Mission 360 website.

Francisco Friday for 5/13/2022

Long established San Francisco Bay Area chess instructor Francisco Anchondo turns the tables on the Fried Liver Attack by using the good old Traxler Variation.

[Event “Casual Blitz game”]

[Date “2022.03.04”]

[White “Anonymous”]

[Black “Francisco Anchondo”]

[Result “0-1”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 Bc5 5.Nxf7 Bxf2+ 6.Kf1 Qe7 7.Nxh8 d5 8.exd5

Nd4 9.c3 Bg4 10.Qa4+ Nd7 11.d6 Qf6 12.Bf7+ Kf8

0-1

Don’t miss your opportunity to study attacking chess with Francisco Anchondo during The Daily Chess Musings Free Online Summer Chess Camps!

Chess Position Worth Sharing 144

Some games are just too good not to share so tonight’s puzzle comes with the entire game as an added bonus. “Too good” is actually quite an understatement. In fact, if I had to demonstrate Paul Morphy’s greatness in just one game, I might choose this one even over the more famous Opera Game. Especially given the fact that this was played during a blindfold simultaneous exhibition, this could be Paul Morphy’s most impressive chessboard performance.

Paul Morphy vs. Pierre Emile Bonford from a 6 Board Blindfold Simultaneous Exhibition played in New Orleans on 3/24/1858.

[Event “Blindfold simul, 6b”]

[Site “New Orleans, LA USA”]

[Date “1858.03.24”]

[EventDate “?”]

[Round “?”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Paul Morphy”]

[Black “Pierre Emile Bonford”]

[ECO “C52”]

[WhiteElo “?”]

[BlackElo “?”]

[PlyCount “53”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4

7. O-O dxc3 8. Ba3 d6 9. Qb3 Nh6 10. Nxc3 Bxc3 11. Qxc3 O-O

12. Rad1 Ng4 13. h3 Nge5 14. Nxe5 Nxe5 15. Be2 f5 16. f4 Nc6

17. Bc4+ Kh8 18. Bb2 Qe7 19. Rde1 Rf6 20. exf5 Qf8 21. Re8

Qxe8 22. Qxf6 Qe7 23. Qxg7+ Qxg7 24. f6 Qxg2+ 25. Kxg2 Bxh3+

26. Kxh3 h5 27. Rg1 1-0

Paul Morphy (white) just played 27. Rg1 which is the start of a checkmating combination. How many more moves will it take for white to checkmate black if both sides play optimally?

Chess Position Worth Sharing 143

The 1927 World Championship Match was a fiercely contested clash of chess styles. Jose Raul Capablanca had a straightforward playing style which, combined with his famously precise endgame play, was his recipe for success. Alexander Alekhine, on the other hand, preferred creating complexities and oftentimes employed risky attacks in route to his victories. Capablanca was a heavy prematch favorite based on his dominating record against Alekhine in their previous encounters. However, in 1927, the Russian challenger adopted a more conservative approach at the chessboard and came out on top in what would be their only World Championship Match.

The position below comes from Round 11 of the Capablanca – Alekhine 1927 World Championship Match. A beautifully complex game resulted in a rare high level chess position with four queens on the board! In fact, Capablanca (white) has just promoted a pawn into his second queen with 65. a8=Q. However, this achievement is short lived as Alexander Alekhine now has a pretty mate in 3. Can you spot Alekhine’s (black’s) game winning combination?

Black to move mate in 3 from Round 11 of the Capablanca – Alekhine World Championship Match played on 10/7/1927 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Blitz Chess Mondays with Lauren Goodkind

May 09, 2022