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Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 65

Some mate-in-3 compositions are much trickier than others. This particular chess puzzle by Erich Ernest Zepler is diabolical!

Chess Position Worth Sharing 140

A young fan of this blog enjoyed the last Sam Loyd puzzle I shared (see: Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle 63) but asked if I had a “slightly easier problem by Samuel Loyd.” So, as was requested, this evening I am sharing another Sam Loyd mate in 3 that is much easier to solveContinue reading “Chess Position Worth Sharing 140”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 64

German chess puzzle composer Herbert Ahues (1922-2015) specialized in the art of the mate in two. He composed more than 4000 chess problems and was awarded the title of Grand Master of Chess Composition by FIDE in 1989. Below is one of his final masterpieces first published in the year of his passing.

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 62

Whether you prefer racking your brain, wracking your brain or even wrecking your brain, this chess puzzle is for you. White to move and mate in two by Herbert Siegfried Oskar Ahues (Troll, 1/2001).

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 60

I enjoy mating puzzles where the target king is surrounded by open squares. In these puzzles, the appearance of freedom for the target king is only an illusion because, in reality, the open squares surrounding it are not free from the influences of distant pieces. In tonight’s puzzle, the black king appears to have severalContinue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 60”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58

When you think about it, our whole life is about solving puzzles. Chess problems are similar to life problems in that solving the puzzle requires careful thought and that through practice, we can improve our ability to quickly find the best solution. So enjoy our daily chess puzzles and smile knowing that by doing soContinue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 56

An equally ingenious and absurd chess puzzle by William L. Barclay from Chess Life and Review. White to move and mate in 2 (William L. Barclay, Chess Life and Review, 1972.)