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Corus Chess 2010: Americans Shine Brightly and Fade

For the first time in recent history, American chess players were commanding respect and attention in Wijk aan Zee.  Hats off to Hikaru Nakamura and Ray Robson for shining bright enough that the chess world took notice. Unfortunately for the American chess fans, it appears that our two rising stars have been swallowed by the black hole residing in round nine. Nakamura was issued his second loss in two games and is now tied for fifth. Meanwhile in the “C” section, Robson took a loss to top rated Li Chao and fell down to second place a half game back of Chao.  GM Robson appears to be running out of steam but remains in striking distance. Below are the dissappointing round nine performances from our American contingent in Wijk aan Zee. Also included is Vladimir Kramnik’s stunner over top rated Magnus Carlsen.  Kramnik has back to back wins over the very dangerous Nakamura and Carlsen. He is now tied for first with Alexei Shirov.

[Event "Corus"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"]
[Date "2010.01.26"]
[EventDate "2010.01.16"]
[Round "9"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Hi Nakamura"]
[Black "Sergey Karjakin"]
[ECO "E21"]
[WhiteElo "2708"]
[BlackElo "2720"]
[PlyCount "96"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 c5 5. g3 cxd4 6. Nxd4 Ne4 7. Qd3 Nxc3
8. bxc3 Be7 9. Bg2 O-O 10. O-O d6 11. Rd1 a6 12. Nb3 Qc7 13. Bf4 e5 14. Be3
Nd7 15. Nd2 f5 16. Rab1 Rb8 17. Ba7 Ra8 18. Be3 Rb8 19. Ba7 Ra8 20. Bd5+
Kh8 21. Qe3 Nf6 22. Bb6 Qd7 23. f4 Qe8 24. Nf3 Qh5 25. Kh1 Re8 26. Qg1 Nxd5
27. cxd5 Bf6 28. Qf2 Bd7 29. c4 Rac8 30. Rdc1 h6 31. e3 Re7 32. c5 exf4 33.
gxf4 dxc5 34. Bxc5 Re4 35. Rxb7 Bb5 36. Qg2 Rc4 37. Rg1 Rc2 38. Qg3 Be2 39.
Ne1 R2xc5 40. e4 fxe4 41. Rxg7 Bf3+ 42. Nxf3 Qxf3+ 43. Qxf3 exf3 44. R7g6
Bg7 45. Rxa6 Rc1 46. Rc6 Rxg1+ 47. Kxg1 Bd4+ 48. Kh1 Rb8 0-1

[Event "Corus (C Group)"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"]
[Date "2010.01.26"]
[EventDate "2010.01.16"]
[Round "9"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Li Chao2"]
[Black "R Robson"]
[ECO "B77"]
[WhiteElo "2604"]
[BlackElo "2570"]
[PlyCount "68"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 O-O 8.
Qd2 Nc6 9. Bc4 Bd7 10. h4 Ne5 11. Bb3 h5 12. O-O-O Rc8 13. Bg5 Rc5 14. Kb1
b5 15. g4 hxg4 16. h5 Nxh5 17. Nd5 Nf6 18. Bh6 Nxd5 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. Qh6+
Kf6 21. exd5 Nxf3 22. Ne2 e5 23. dxe6 Bxe6 24. Qf4+ Rf5 25. Qxg4 Kg7 26.
Bxe6 fxe6 27. Nd4 Nxd4 28. Qxd4+ e5 29. Qxa7+ R8f7 30. Qe3 Qg5 31. Qd3 Qf6
32. a3 Rf2 33. Qh3 Qf5 34. Qh8+ 1-0

[Event "Corus"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee, Ned"]
[Date "2010.01.26"]
[EventDate "2010.01.16"]
[Round "9"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Carlsen"]
[Black "Kramnik"]
[ECO "E04"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "2"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.g3 dxc4 5.Bg2 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 a5 7.Nc3 O-O 8.a3 Be7
 9.Qa4 c6 10.Qxc4 b5 11.Qb3 Ba6 12.Bg5 Nbd7 13.Bxf6 gxf6 14.Qc2 b4 15.Na4 Rc8
 16.O-O c5 17.d5 exd5 18.Bh3 Bb5 19.axb4 axb4 20.Rfd1 d4 21.Bf5 Ne5 22.Bxh7+ Kg7
 23.Nxe5 fxe5 24.Bf5 Rc6 25.Qe4 Rh8 26.Qxe5+ Bf6 27.Qe4 Re8 28.Qg4+ Kf8 29.Be4 c4
 30.Bxc6 Bxc6 31.Qh5 Re5 32.Qh6+ Ke7 33.e4 d3 34.Qe3 Bxe4 35.Nb6 Bb7 36.Qf4 Qxb6
 37.Qxc4 Re2 38.Rf1  0-1

Report on the 2010 Corus Chess Tournament

In round 6 of the 2010 Corus Chess Tournament, Alexei Shirov was forced to settle for a draw against Nigel Short. Shirov’s remarkable win streak came to a soft ending. Short remarked to reporters, “I stopped the unstoppable machine!”

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2010.01.22”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Shirov”]
[Black “Short”]
[ECO “C96”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 O-O 9.h3 Na5 10.Bc2 c5 11.d4 Nd7 12.Nbd2 exd4 13.cxd4 Re8 14.b3 Nc6 15.Bb2 cxd4 16.Nxd4 Nxd4 17.Bxd4 Bb7 18.a4 Bf6 19.Nf3 bxa4 20.Rxa4 Rc8 21.Bd3 Nc5 22.Bxc5 Rxc5 23.Bxa6 Bc6 24.Rc4 Rxc4 25.Bxc4 Rxe4 26.Rxe4 Bxe4 27.Bd5 Bxf3 28.Qxf3 Qe7 29.g3 g6 30.b4 Bd4 31.Kg2  1/2-1/2

In Round 7, Shirov was shocked by a loss at the hands of Nakamura. Nakamura raised hopes in his fans that an American could win the Corus Chess Tournament.

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2010.01.23”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “7”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Nakamura”]
[Black “Shirov”]
[ECO “B33”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bg5 a6 8.Bxf6 gxf6 9.Na3 f5 10.Nc4 Nd4 11.exf5 Bxf5 12.Ne3 Bg6 13.Ncd5 Bh6 14.c3 Ne6 15.Bd3 Bxe3 16.Nxe3 Qb6 17.O-O Nf4 18.Be2 Rg8 19.Bf3 Nh3+ 20.Kh1 Nxf2+ 21.Rxf2 Qxe3 22.Bxb7 Rb8 23.Re2 Qb6 24.Bd5 Rg7 25.Qd2 f5 26.Rf1 Kd7 27.b4 f4 28.a4 a5 29.b5 Rd8 30.g3 fxg3 31.hxg3 Kc8 32.c4 Kb8 33.Rf6 Re7 34.Kh2 e4 35.Qc3 Rc8 36.Re3 Ka7 37.Bc6 Rd8 38.c5 dxc5 39.Bxe4 Rd6 40.Rxd6 Qxd6 41.Qxa5+  1-0

In Round 8, Nakamura had a major set back. Loosing to Kramnik forced him to fall two places in the standings and caused many supporters to give up on the hope that he could actually win the Corus Chess Tournament. I should not have to remind all the fair weather fans that it is perfectly acceptable for Nakamura to take a loss with the black pieces against a player as strong as Kramnik. Nakamura’s day will come and it still could happen this January.

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2010.01.24”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “8”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Nakamura”]
[ECO “A88”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.c4 Bg7 5.Nc3 O-O 6.Nf3 d6 7.O-O c6 8.Rb1 Ne4 9.Qc2 Nxc3 10.bxc3 e5 11.Rd1 e4 12.Ng5 h6 13.Nh3 g5 14.f3 d5 15.Nf2 Kh8 16.cxd5 cxd5 17.c4 e3 18.Nd3 Nc6 19.Bxe3 Nxd4 20.Bxd4 Bxd4+ 21.Kh1 f4 22.Rb5 Qf6 23.Rxd5 Be6 24.Nxf4 gxf4 25.R5xd4 fxg3 26.hxg3 Rg8 27.Rf4 Qg5 28.Rh4 Rg6 29.Qc3+ Kh7 30.f4 Qxg3 31.Qxg3 Rxg3 32.Bxb7 Rb8 33.Be4+ Kg7 34.Kh2 Re3 35.Rg1+ Kf7 36.Bg6+ Ke7 37.Bd3 Rb2 38.Rg2 Rxa2 39.Rxh6 Bf7 40.Rh7 Kf6 41.c5 Ra4 42.c6 Rxf4 43.c7 Re8 44.Rxf7+  1-0

Here are the current standings of the Corus 2010 Chess Tournament:

1.    A. Shirov    6
2.    M. Carlsen
V. Kramnik    5½
4.    H. Nakamura    5
5.    S. Karjakin
L. Dominguez
P. Leko
V. Ivanchuk    4½
9.    V. Anand    4
10.    F. Caruana    3½
11.    S. Tiviakov
N. Short    2½
13.    L. van Wely    2
14.    J. Smeets    1½

Алексей Дмитриевич Широв at Corus 2010

Alexei Shirov is absolutely destroying GM after GM in the 2010 edition of the prestigious Corus Super Tournament. His  pace of 5 points in 5 rounds borders on ridiculous and has landed him an astronomical performance rating that can not be truly calcualted until he does not win a game. Once again I find myself wondering why the greatest attacking chess player of my generation was never in a World Championship Match. Oh yes… I recall now.  In 1998 Shirov was invited to play a match against Kramnik to determine the challenger for then World Champion Kasparov. Shirov won the match. However a dishonorable  Kasparov elected to play Kramnik instead and thus deprived Shirov of his rightfuly earned chance to play for the World Championship title. I strongly suggest that readers of this blog do some quick searches to read the comments from these players regarding this unfortunate incident. Below is my favorite game from Shirov at Corus 2010. Perhaps visitors can comment on the Tal styled sacrafice on move 26.

[Event “Corus”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
[Date “2010.01.19”]
[EventDate “2010.01.16”]
[Round “4”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “A Shirov”]
[Black “J Smeets”]
[ECO “C42”]
[WhiteElo “2723”]
[BlackElo “2657”]
[PlyCount “74”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. O-O Be7
8. c4 Nb4 9. Be2 O-O 10. Nc3 Bf5 11. a3 Nxc3 12. bxc3 Nc6 13. Re1 Re8 14.
cxd5 Qxd5 15. Bf4 Rac8 16. h3 h6 17. Nd2 Na5 18. Nf1 Qb3 19. Qd2 Nc4 20.
Bxc4 Qxc4 21. Ne3 Qb5 22. c4 Qd7 23. c5 Bg6 24. Rac1 c6 25. Nc4 f6 26. Bxh6
gxh6 27. Qxh6 Bh7 28. Re3 Bf8 29. Rg3+ Kh8 30. Qxf6+ Bg7 31. Qg5 Bxd4 32.
Rd1 Rf8 33. Kh2 Rcd8 34. Ne5 Qc7 35. Rxd4 Rxd4 36. Ng6+ Kg7 37. Nxf8+ 1-0

For Immediate Release: Scholastic Chess Tournaments in the Bay Area

For Immediate Release:

Torres Chess and Music Academy, Inc. Presents:

The SPHDS Quads

At the South Peninsula Hebrew Day School – 1030 Astoria Dr., Sunnyvale, CA 94087

Sunday, February 7th, 2010 AND Sunday, March 7th, 2010

Where: South Peninsula Hebrew Day School

When: 1:00pm – 4:00pm

What: Scholastic (K-12) 3 Round Quad – G/30

Cost: $20 for one or $30 for both.

Trophies are awarded to top player(s) in each quad. All other players will receive medals.

USCF Rated Quad Format:

All players must be U.S. Chess Federation (USCF) members, and understand USCF tournament rules. To register for USCF pay an additional $16 for 12 & under; $19 for 15 and under; $25 for 16 to 24.

3 round Quad Format – Everyone plays 3 games against players in their quad. Quads are formed by making groups of four by rating. All sections will be Game in 30 min (each player). Sets and boards provided. Clocks will be provided, but players are encouraged to bring their own. Financial aid is available upon request.

Round Times: Check In/Late Registration begins at 12:00 PM.

R 1 @ 1:00pm * R 2 @ 2:00pm * R 3 @ 3:00 pm *

Trophies and medals awarded at the conclusion of each quad

Entry Fees: $20 entry fee for one quad $30 entry fee for both.

Make check payable to: TCAMA or APPLY ONLINE at www.siliconvalleychess.com

Information: Contact Chris Torres at 661-699-8348 or Chesslessons@aol.com.

Website: www.SiliconValleyChess.com www.ChessandMusic.com or www.sphds.org

PLEASE EAT BEFORE COMING TO THE TOURNAMENT!

NON-KOSHER FOOD IS NOT ALLOWED ON CAMPUS!!!

(DETACH AND RETURN APPLICATION BELOW WITH PAYMENT)

– – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Torres Chess and Music Academy, Inc. Presents:

The SPHDS Quads

1 $20.00 to attend the February 7th Quads

1 $20.00 to attend the March 7th Quads

1 $30.00 to attend both the February and March Quads

1 Annual fee for USCF membership: $16 for 12 & under; $19 for 13 to 15; $25 for 16 to 24

Total $ _________ Check payable to TCAMA.

MAIL TO: TCAMA, 1832 Walnut Grove Ct., Oakley, CA 94561

OR APPLY ONLINE AT SILICONVALLEYCHESS.COM

Name: __________________________________________________________

Address: _____________________________________________ City: _________________ CA Zip: _________

Birth Date: ____/____/____ Phone: (___) ______________ E-Mail: ______________________________

School: __________________________________________________ Grade: ____

USCF ID #: ___________________________ USCF Rating: ________________ Exp Date: __/__/__

I request that my child, (named above) be permitted to participate in the 2/7/10 and/or 3/7/10 Chess event(s). I fully understand that it is my (or my representative’s) responsibility for supervising my child during this event. Should it be necessary for my child to have medical treatment while participating in this event, I hereby give the supervisory personnel permission to use their judgment in obtaining medical services for my child, and I give permission to the physician selected by such personnel to render medical treatment deemed necessary and appropriate. I, as parent or representative of this child, hereby release, discharge, indemnify, and hold harmless the TCAMA, the South Peninsula Hebrew Day School, and their employees, volunteers or agents, and/or staff, from any claims arising out of, or relating to, any injury that may result to said individual while participating in this event. I, as a parent or representative of this child, hereby waive any rights to the taking and use of photographs, (including posting on SiliconValleyChess.com, ChessandMusic.com or any promotional material) or any other recorded material, including video and audio taken during this chess tournament. I, as a parent or representative of this child, hereby consent to the publication of this child’s individual tournament results/scores.

Parent/Guardian Signature: ________________________________________ Date: __/__/__

Print Name: ________________________________________ Relationship ________________

End


California Chess Tournaments

Kids playing chess at a tournament directed by Chris Torres.

Chris Torres has been one of the most successful scholastic chess organizers since 1998. His chess tournaments are extremely well organized and offer young chess players an opportunity to compete in a structured format and receive chess instruction from the best chess teachers in California. For information on these chess tournaments please visit SiliconValleyChess.com and ChessAndMusic.com.

2009 CalChess Grade Level Championship: Part 2

Mihir Bhuptani poses behind his trophy with coach Chris Torres.

Wall Chart. 2009 CalChess State Grade Level: Kindergarten (standings)
#    Name/Rtng/ID    Rd 1    Rd 2    Rd 3    Rd 4    Rd 5    Tot
1    Jack Chin    B  16    W    6    B    4    B    2    W    5
unr.   14288146           1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     5.0     5.0
2    Gia Peterson    B  18    W  10    B    9    W    1    B    6
539   14164190   (533)        1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
3    Amy  L Chan    B  11    W  12    bye      W  14    B    9
131   14115781           0.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
4    Soorya Kuppam    B  13    B    7    W    1    W    9    B  12
unr.   14267883           1.0     2.0     2.0     2.5     3.5     3.5
5    Bryan Mathia Wong    –  21    –  20    B    6    W  11    B    1
190   14018447   (185)       X1.0    X2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
6    Beaumont Zhang    W  14    B    1    W    5    B  10    W    2
unr.   14285194           1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
7    Ben Rood    B  19    W    4    B  11    W  17    B  14
unr.   14239084           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
8    Jake Marshal    W    9    W  13    B  10    B  18    W  19
unr.   14262494           0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
9    Advait Budaraju    B    8    W  11    W    2    B    4    W    3
unr.   14276583           1.0     2.0     2.0     2.5     2.5     2.5
10    Chinguun  Bayaraa    B  15    B    2    W    8    W    6    B  11
unr.   14271324           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.5     2.5
11    Aaron Ng    W    3    B    9    W    7    B    5    W  10
unr.   14302925           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.5     2.5
12    Ryan Sheng    bye      B    3    –  15    W  13    W    4
unr.                              0.5     0.5     1.5     2.5     2.5     2.5
13    Antarish  Rautela    W    4    B    8    W  19    B  12    W  18
unr.   14246081           0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
14    Muthiah Panchanatham    B    6    W  16    W  17    B    3    W    7
unr.   14301750           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
15    Allen Yan    W  10    W  18    –  12    —-    —-
unr.   14284164           0.0     1.0     1.0    U1.0    X2.0     2.0
16    Ansh Gandhi    W    1    B  14    W  18    B  19    B  17
unr.   14288606           0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0
17    Christopher Tan    —-    W  19    B  14    B    7    W  16
unr.   14004206          U0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
18    Julie Ganzorig    W    2    B  15    B  16    W    8    B  13
unr.   14269131           0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
19    Dominic Pang    W    7    B  17    B  13    W  16    B    8
unr.   14287075           0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
20    Bayarra Chinguun    —-    –    5    —-    —-    —-
470   1427134            U0.0    F0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0     0.0
21    Nico Tribuzio    –    5    —-    —-    —-    —-
unr.   14278903          F0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0     0.0

Wall Chart. 2009 CalChess State Grade Level: 1st Grade (standings)
#    Name/Rtng/ID    Rd 1    Rd 2    Rd 3    Rd 4    Rd 5    Tot
1    Josiah P Stearman    W  20    B    9    W    7    B    2    B    3
1176   14006506           1.0     2.0     3.0     3.5     4.5     4.5
2    Arun  G Khemani    B  11    W  18    B    4    W    1    B    7
1008   13912844   (975)        1.0     2.0     3.0     3.5     4.5     4.5
3    Solomon Ge    W  21    B  15    W    5    B    6    W    1
845   14154077           1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0     4.0
4    Hari Kris Kumaran    W  26    B  23    W    2    B  19    W  13
511   14207485           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
5    Mihir Bhuptani    B  31    W  13    B    3    B  12    W    8
404   14082402           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
6    Zachary Greco    B  12    W  19    B  22    W    3    W  15
704   13838986   (709)        1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
7    Selena Wong    B  22    W  16    B    1    W  24    W    2
505   13951716           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
8    Estella Wong    W  23    B  25    B  19    W  14    B    5
438   13951722           0.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
9    James Pflaging    B  24    W    1    B  14    W  20    B  22
292   14201972           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
10    Avyay Varadarajan    B  13    W  14    W  28    B  23    B  24
272   14241318           0.0     0.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
11    John Andrew Chan    W    2    B  28    W  13    B  26    B  17
159   14044313           0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
12    Charlie Jones    W    6    B  30    B  17    W    5    B  18
unr.   14239152           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
13    Hari Stoyanov    W  10    B    5    B  11    W  18    B    4
unr.   14239167           1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
14    Luke Zhao    W  15    B  10    W    9    B    8    W  19
unr.   14282042           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
15    a Miles Olive Manga    B  14    W    3    B  16    W  21    B    6
221   14120178   (221)        1.0     1.0     1.5     2.5     2.5     2.5
16    Nicholas Evenden    B  27    B    7    W  15    W  17    B  21
unr.   14292651           1.0     1.0     1.5     1.5     2.5     2.5
17    Rowen Barnes    W  19    B  26    W  12    B  16    W  11
363   14202048           0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
18    Pradyumn Acharya    W  30    B    2    W  23    B  13    W  12
263   14043477           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
19    Ben Levinson    B  17    B    6    W    8    W    4    B  14
214   12825995           1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
20    Amirah Moham Rafi    B    1    W  24    W  29    B    9    W  25
211   14142190           0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
21    Greg Kornguth    B    3    bye      W  25    B  15    W  16
102   14240170           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
22    Tommy Koh    W    7    B  29    W    6    B  27    W    9
unr.   14283820           0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
23    Janya Budaraju    B    8    W    4    B  18    W  10    W  28
unr.   14276577           1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
24    Marcus Lee    W    9    B  20    W  27    B    7    W  10
unr.   14292672           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
25    Srinjo Chatterjee    bye      W    8    B  21    W  30    B  20
259   14124605           0.5     0.5     0.5     1.5     1.5     1.5
26    Thomas Yu    B    4    W  17    B  30    W  11    W  27
unr.   14260586           0.0     0.0     0.5     0.5     1.5     1.5
27    Enkhj Gomboluudev    W  16    –  31    B  24    W  22    B  26
291   14079545   (291)        0.0    X1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
28    David Pena    —-    W  11    B  10    W  29    B  23
unr.   14298048          U0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
29    William  Adams    —-    W  22    B  20    B  28    W  30
unr.                             U0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0
30    Sean Bochaton    B  18    W  12    W  26    B  25    B  29
unr.   14287081           0.0     0.0     0.5     0.5     0.5     0.5
31    William Adams    W    5    –  27    —-    —-    —-
unr.                              0.0    F0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0     0.0

Wall Chart. 2009 CalChess State Grade Level: 2nd Grade (standings)
#    Name/Rtng/ID    Rd 1    Rd 2    Rd 3    Rd 4    Rd 5    Tot
1    Rayan Taghizadeh    B    7    W    8    B    4    W    3    B    5
1537   13880825           1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     5.0     5.0
2    Om Chinchwadkar    W  15    B  19    W    5    B  10    W    9
1236   13796783   (930)        1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
3    Anthony Zhou    W  14    B    9    W    6    B    1    W  13
972   14202012           1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
4    Dante Peterson    W  25    B  20    W    1    B  12    W  14
888   14164184   (869)        1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
5    Bryce M Wong    W  23    B  31    B    2    W  16    W    1
819   13644104   (830)        1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0     4.0
6    Kevin Zhu    B  13    W  12    B    3    W    7    B  16
1097   14033094           1.0     2.0     2.0     2.5     3.5     3.5
7    Serafina Show    W    1    B  27    W  31    B    6    B  18
590   13964624           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.5     3.5     3.5
8    Ojas Arun    W  26    B    1    W  17    B  13    W  20
675   14192020           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
9    Joanna Liu    B  30    W    3    W  20    B  22    B    2
674   14090307           1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
10    Maximo T Tribuzio    W  27    B  28    B  16    W    2    W  22
667   14138998           0.5     1.5     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
11    Howard Leona Tang    B  31    W  32    B  22    W  24    B  23
651   14247262   (653)        0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
12    Daniel # George    W  17    B    6    B  24    W    4    W  19
646   13996856   (649)        1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
13    Bruce Liu    W    6    B  26    W  18    W    8    B    3
575   14180487           0.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
14    Alvin J Zhang    B    3    W  29    W  19    B  25    B    4
562   13969710           0.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
15    Alexander Wong    B    2    W  24    B  26    W  17    B  27
588   14169745           0.0     0.0     1.0     1.5     2.5     2.5
16    Phillip Chin    W  28    B  18    W  10    B    5    W    6
520   13975164           1.0     2.0     2.5     2.5     2.5     2.5
17    Abtin Olaee    B  12    W  21    B    8    B  15    W  25
unr.   13739495           0.0     1.0     1.0     1.5     2.5     2.5
18    Derek Hua    B  21    W  16    B  13    B  27    W    7
846   14164403           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
19    Warren Xu    B  29    W    2    B  14    W  21    B  12
819   14180466           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
20    Arthur Fargher    B  32    W    4    B    9    W  31    B    8
592   14046070           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
21    Edward Liu    W  18    B  17    W  29    B  19    B  31
505   13955684           0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
22    Seiji Minowada    —-    B  23    W  11    W    9    B  10
476   13994577   (478)       U0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
23    Niko Duffy    B    5    W  22    B  32    W  30    W  11
294   14204066           0.0     0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
24    Michael Ryaboy    —-    B  15    W  12    B  11    W  28
unr.                             U0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
25    Douglas Zeller    B    4    W  30    B  28    W  14    B  17
506   13994651           0.0     0.5     1.5     1.5     1.5     1.5
26    Emmanuel Maria    B    8    W  13    W  15    B  29    W  32
129   14191288           0.0     0.0     0.0     0.5     1.5     1.5
27    Kimberly Liu    B  10    W    7    B  30    W  18    W  15
unr.   14268494           0.5     0.5     1.5     1.5     1.5     1.5
28    Nichol Cardarelli    B  16    W  10    W  25    B  32    B  24
900   13743705           0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
29    Parker Ra Bizjack    W  19    B  14    B  21    W  26    B  30
222   14178157           0.0     0.0     0.0     0.5     1.0     1.0
30    Fraser Coleman    W    9    B  25    W  27    B  23    W  29
unr.   14291113           0.0     0.5     0.5     0.5     1.0     1.0
31    Jason Haas    W  11    W    5    B    7    B  20    W  21
unr.   14239125           1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
32    Jonathan DeMiguel    W  20    B  11    W  23    W  28    B  26
unr.   14292048           0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0

Wall Chart. 2009 CalChess State Grade Level: 3rd Grade (standings)
#    Name/Rtng/ID    Rd 1    Rd 2    Rd 3    Rd 4    Rd 5    Tot
1    Michael Wang    W  20    B  22    W    5    B    4    W    2
1397   14224170           1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.5     4.5
2    Leyton Ho    B  19    W    6    B    9    W    8    B    1
1340   13850433           1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.5     4.5
3    Seaver Dahlgren    B  25    W  12    B    8    W    7    B  11
1245   13590882           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
4    Anirudh Seela    B  27    W  14    B  11    W    1    B  10
1210   13813698           1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
5    Leonar Cardarelli    B  28    W  16    B    1    W  23    B  18
1015   13518341           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
6    Justin J Tan    W  37    B    2    W  20    B  17    B    9
828   13736756   (819)        1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     4.0     4.0
7    Evan Baldonado    W  26    B  13    W  10    B    3    W    8
1219   13730688           1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.5     3.5
8    Lawrence Wong    W  29    B  41    W    3    B    2    B    7
970   13706652           1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.5     3.5
9    Lance Finley    W  36    B  15    W    2    B  16    W    6
1022   14225241           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
10    Desiree Ho    B  31    W  18    B    7    W  24    W    4
931   13601087           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
11    Julia Schulman    B  32    W  21    W    4    B  15    W    3
829   13880501           1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
12    Drake Lin    W  43    B    3    B  24    W  31    W  19
699   13826475           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
13    Jimmy Ro Schaffer    B  38    W    7    B  27    W  18    B  24
696   13975838           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
14    Jonathan Ko    W  30    B    4    W  26    B  19    W  29
687   13590368           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
15    Ian Matthew Wong    B  40    W    9    B  28    W  11    B  32
676   14095037           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
16    Lindsay Kornguth    W  39    B    5    W  36    W    9    B  26
651   14176920           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
17    Ridd Ranjithkumar    B  21    W  31    B  40    W    6    B  27
602   14008290           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
18    Suleyman Saib    W  42    B  10    W  41    B  13    W    5
555   13738554           1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
19    Sainath Kesari    W    2    B  37    W  21    W  14    B  12
546   13698342           0.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0     3.0
20    Al Neumann-loreck    B    1    W  32    B    6    B  22    W  35
530   13914794           0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
21    Alexander Makhratchev    W  17    B  11    B  19    W  30    B  23
unr.   14266942           1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     3.0     3.0
22    Rohith Kolli    B  33    W    1    B  25    W  20    W  38
753   13793474           1.0     1.0     1.5     1.5     2.5     2.5
23    Aaron Lin    W  41    B  24    W  29    B    5    W  21
636   13511436           0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
24    Ian Cheng    B  35    W  23    W  12    B  10    W  13
530   14040572           1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
25    Aditya Krishnan    W    3    B  43    W  22    B  26    W  33
496   14069218           0.0     1.0     1.5     1.5     2.0     2.0
26    Eric Chang    B    7    W  33    B  14    W  25    W  16
433   14033108           0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
27    Michael Manguyen    W    4    B  39    W  13    B  41    W  17
422   13973241   (424)        0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
28    Owen Sherry    W    5    B  42    W  15    B  35    W  41
392   13977600           0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
29    Andrew # Paul    B    8    W  35    B  23    W  40    B  14
379   14232850   (383)        0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
30    Akshay Gharpure    B  14    W  40    –  38    B  21    W  39
365   14061928           0.0     0.0    X1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
31    Jeffrey Deng    W  10    B  17    W  42    B  12    W  40
362   13983473           0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
32    Sara Kaushik    W  11    B  20    W  39    B  36    W  15
290   13878041           0.0     0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
33    Rini Vasan    W  22    B  26    W  43    B  34    B  25
195   13683505           0.0     0.0     0.5     1.5     2.0     2.0
34    Diego Pena    –  45    B  36    bye      W  33    B  43
106   13739007          F0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     2.0     2.0
35    Bhagvat Maheta    W  24    B  29    W  37    W  28    B  20
unr.   14261657           0.0     0.0     1.0     2.0     2.0     2.0
36    Arvind Ragunathan    B    9    W  34    B  16    W  32    B  37
397   14081744           0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.5     1.5
37    Haakon Black    B    6    W  19    B  35    B  43    W  36
275   13971636           0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.5     1.5
38    Pranav Acharya    W  13    bye      –  30    bye      B  22
119   14043483           0.0     1.0    F1.0     1.5     1.5     1.5
39    Nishant Yadav    B  16    W  27    B  32    W  42    B  30
unr.   14203413           0.0     0.0     0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
40    Mathias Hall    W  15    B  30    W  17    B  29    B  31
unr.   14282900           0.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
41    Andrew Ng    B  23    W    8    B  18    W  27    B  28
unr.   14302931           1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0     1.0
42    Shivani Seshan    B  18    W  28    B  31    B  39    –  46
unr.   14266606           0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0    X1.0     1.0
43    Keya Jonnalagadda    B  12    W  25    B  33    W  37    W  34
192   14117882           0.0     0.0     0.5     0.5     0.5     0.5
44    Vikram Vasan    —-    —-    —-    —-    —-
1318   12937705          U0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0     0.0
45    Justin Su    –  34    —-    —-    —-    —-
882   13758233          F0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0     0.0
46         —-    —-    —-    —-    –  42
unr.                             U0.0    U0.0    U0.0    U0.0    F0.0     0.0

CalChess Grade Level Championship

This weekend I am enjoying my duties as a coach at the CalChess Grade Level Championship in Stockton. I will be posting tournament crosstables, games and photos both nights of the tournament. This blogger is extremely grateful that Calchess President Tom Langland performed the chief tournament director duties.

Below is a very instructional game played by  Srinath Goli (Mission San Jose Elementary School) who demonstrated to his opponent why masters prefer 4. c3 rather than 4. O-O in the  Italian Game. This game is a real gem and is the best performance I have seen from Srinath to date.

[Event “Grade Level Championship”]
[Site “Stockton”]
[Date “2009.11.21”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Li, Jack”]
[Black “Goli, Srinath”]
[Result “0-1”]
[PlyCount “84”]
[TimeControl “g60”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. d3 Bg4 7. Bg5 Nd4 8. Nd5 Nxf3+ 9. gxf3 Bh3 10. Re1 h6 11. Nxf6+ gxf6 12. Be3 Rg8+ 13. Kh1 Bg2+ 14. Kg1 Bxf3+ 15. Kf1 Bxd1 16. Raxd1 Bxe3 17. Rxe3 Qd7 18. b3 O-O-O 19. a4 f5 20. Bb5 Qe6 21. Bc4 Qf6 22. Rf3 f4 23. b4 Qh4 24. Bxf7 Rg7 25. Be6+ Kb8 26. Rh3 Qf6 27. Bf5
Rdg8 28. Ke2 Rg1 29. Rxg1 Rxg 30. f3 a6 31. Kf2 Rg5 32. c4 h5 33. b5 axb5 34. axb5 h4 35. Rxh4 Ka7 36. Rh3 Rxf5 37. exf5 Qxf5 38. Kg2 Qxd3 39. Rh8 Qxc4 40. h4 Qxb5 41. Kh3 Qd7+ 42. Kg2 Qg7+ 0-1

Tal Memorial 2009: Round 7

In round 7 Vassily Ivanchuk punishes Boris Gelfand’s small inaccuracies with authority. Now Ivanchuk and Anand are just a half game behind Kramnik.  Below is Ivanchuk’s win followed by a game where the opening line was first played.

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “1:06:33-0:46:33”]
[Date “2009.11.12”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “7”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Ivanchuk”]
[Black “Gelfand”]
[ECO “A06”]

1.d4 d5{notes by Chris Torres} 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bg4 5.h3 Bxf3 6.Qxf3 e6 7.Nc3 Nbd7 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 Bd6 10.O-O O-O 11.e4 e5 12.d5 Nb6 13.Bd3 cxd5 14.exd5 h6 15.Be3 Rc8 16.Rac1 Nc4{This mistake will cost Gelfland the pawn on a7. Gelfland should have played 16…Bc5} 17.Bxc4 Rxc4 18.Qe2 Rc8 19.Bxa7 b6{Another error. Gelfland should have played 19…Qa5.} 20.Nb5 Rc5 21.Rfd1 Qd7 22.Nxd6{Ivanchuk should have continued with 22.Rxc5 Bxc5 23.a4 Qb7. 24.a5 with a powerful advantage. His slight error allows Gelfland more drawing chances.} Qxd6{Gelfland failed to find the best variation. 22…Rxc1 23.Rxc1 Qxd6 24.a4 Nxd5 25.Rd1 Qc6 26.Qb5 Qxb5 27.axb5 Ra8 seems to aim toward a draw.} 23.Rxc5 Qxc5 24.Qe3 Qc2 25.Qb3 Qxb3 26.axb3 Rd8 27.d6 b5 28.f3 Ra8 29.Be3 Nd7 30.Rd5 Rb8 31.f4 exf4 32.Bxf4 f6 33.Rd2 Kf7 34.Kf2 Ke6 35.Ke3 Rc8 36.Kd4 g5{36…b4 seems stronger. Play could continue 37.g4 Rc6 38.Re2 Ne5 39.Bxe5 fxe5 40.Rxe5 Kxd6. Ivanchuk punishes Gelfland’s small inaccuracies with authority.} 37.Re2+ Ne5 38.Bxe5 fxe5+ 39.Rxe5+ Kxd6 40.Rxb5 Rc2 41.g4 Rxb2 42.Rb6+ Kc7 43.Kc3  1-0

[Event “?”]
[Site “Pardubice”]
[Date “1994.??.??”]
[White “Murdzia,Piotr”]
[Black “Krasenkov,Mikhail”]
[Round “?”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “A06”]

1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 c6 3. e3 Nf6 4. c4 Bg4 5. Nc3
e6 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 Nbd7 8. Bd3 Bd6 9. O-O
O-O 10. e4 dxc4 11. Bxc4 e5 12. d5 Nb6 13. Bb3
Nfd7 14. a3 c5 15. Qg4 Kh8 16. Bg5 f6 17. Bd2
c4 18. Bc2 Bc5 19. h4 Bd4 20. h5 Nc8 21. g3
Nd6 22. Rab1 b5 23. Ne2 a5 24. Kg2 Bc5 25. f4
f5 26. exf5 Nf6 27. Qg5 Nf7  0-1

2009 Tal Memorial: Round 6

Today Kramnik  was able to win his game multiple times do to inaccurate play on both his and Ponomariov’s part.  I am in shock that the same Kramnik that missed 19.Qxh7+ played such a precise endgame.  Thanks to Ponomariov, Kramnik was able to pull ahead of Anand and is now in first place all by himself.

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “0:10:33-0:08:33”]
[Date “2009.11.11”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “V Kramnik”]
[Black “R Ponomariov”]
[ECO “D38”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]

1.d4 e6{Nots by Chris Torres} 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.e3 c5 8.dxc5{Kramnik elects not to develop his bishop to e2,d3 or b5 and instead plays a sharp variation that leaves his King in the middle of the board.} Qa5 9.Rc1 Ne4 10.Qxd5 Nxc3 11.bxc3 Bxc3+ 12.Kd1 O-O 13.Bc4 Nf6 14.Bxf6 Bxf6 15.Ke2 b5{I think this is a mistake. Perhaps Ponomariov could have played: 15…Be6 16.Qe4 Rae8 17.Rhd1 Bh3 18.Qxb7 Bxg2 19.Qd7 Rb8 20.Bb3 Rbd8 21.Qa4 Qc7 22.Rxd8 Rxd8 with equal chances} 16.c6 Ba6 17.Qf5 Qa3{This is a serious mistake. Ponomariov shpould have played:17…Bb2 18.Rc2 g6 19.Qc5 Ba3 20.Qg5 Be7 21.Qe5 Bd6 and the players are dead even.}  18.Bd3 Rfd8 19.c7{I can’t beleive Kramnik missed 19.Qxh7+ Kf8 20.c7Qxa2 21.Kf1. Its is always very interesting to see the mind of a chess genius play tricks on itself.} Qxa2+ 20.Nd2 Rxd3{Ponomariov is right back in the game thanks to Kramnik’s mistake on move 19.} 21.Qxd3 b4 22.Kf3 Bb7+{This is not accurate. Ponomariov should have played 22…Qa5 23.Qd6 Bb7 24.Ke2 Ba6 25.Ke1 Rc8 26.f3 Be5} 23.Kg3 h5 24.h3{f4 would be better. Play could continue 24…Rc8 25.Rhd1 Qe6 26.Rhd1 Bc6 27.Qc4 Rxc7 28.Qxb4 Qg4 with Kramnik clearly superior.} Qa5 25.f4 Rc8 26.Nc4 Qa6 27.Ne5 Qxd3 28.Nxd3 Bc3 29.Rhd1 a5 30.Nc5 Rxc7 31.Na4 Be4 32.Rd6{Kramnik makes a huge mistake. Luckily Ponomariov does not punish him with 32…Bc2! 33.Nxc3 Rxc3 34.Rb6 Rc4 35.Rb8 Kh7 36.Rb5 a4 37.Rxb4 Rxb4 38.Rxc2 a3 39.Ra2 Rb3 40.e5 Rxe3 41.Kf4 Rb3 42.Ke5 Kh6 43.h4 g6 44.fxg6 Kxg6 45.Kd4 Kf6 46.Kc4 Re3} Kh7{Missed the opportunity for 32…Bc2! see previous note} 33.Ra6 h4+ 34.Kh2 Rd7 35.Nc5 Re7 36.Rxa5 Bd2 37.Rc4 f5{This is a horrible mistake. It must be Kramnik’s lucky day! Play should have continued with 37…b3 38.Nxb3 Bxa5 39.Nxa5 Re6 40.Rd4 f5.} 38.Nxe4 fxe4 39.Rh5+ Kg6 40.Rg5+ Kf6 41.Rc6+ Kf7 42.Rf5+ Kg8 43.g4 Re8 44.Re5 Rb8 45.g5 Kh7 46.Re7 Bxe3 47.Rh6+ Kg8 48.Rg6 Bd4 49.Rge6 Kh7{It really is Kramnik’s lucky day. Ponomariov should have played 49…Bc5 and now Kramnik will punish him.} 50.f5 Bc5 51.Re8 Rxe8 52.Rxe8 b3 53.Kg2 Be3 54.Rxe4{The moves that follow are beautiful to watch. Even god using Deep Rybka would not have had a chance. I love the final position. Zugzwang anyone?}  Bxg5 55.Rb4 g6 56.Rb7+ Kh6 57.fxg6 Kxg6 58.Kf3 Bd2 59.Kg4 Be1 60.Rxb3 Bg3 61.Rf3 Be1 62.Re3 Bf2 63.Re6+ Kf7 64.Kf5 Bg3 65.Re4 Bf2 66.Kg5 Bg3 67.Re2 Kg7 68.Re7+ Kf8 69.Kf6 Bf2 70.Re6 Bg3 71.Kg6 Bh2 72.Re4 Bg3 73.Kf6 Bf2 74.Kg6 Bg3 75.Re2 Bd6 76.Kg5 Bg3 77.Kf6 Bf4 78.Re4 Bd6 79.Rd4 Bc7 80.Kg6 Bg3 81.Re4  1-0

(Table below aquired from http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/tal-memorial-2009)

Tal Memorial Moscow (RUS), 5-14 xi 2009 cat. XXI (2764)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
1. Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2772 * ½ ½ . ½ . 1 1 . 1 2958
2. Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2788 ½ * . ½ ½ . ½ . 1 1 4 2884
3. Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2758 ½ . * . ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ . 2823
4. Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2739 . ½ . * ½ . ½ 1 ½ ½ 2821
5. Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2801 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ . ½ . . 3 2765
6. Aronian, Levon g ARM 2786 . . 0 . ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 3 2759
7. Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 2739 0 ½ ½ ½ . ½ * . . ½ 2709
8. Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2750 0 . ½ 0 ½ ½ . * ½ . 2 2643
9. Leko, Peter g HUN 2752 . 0 ½ ½ . 0 . ½ * ½ 2 2637
10. Svidler, Peter g RUS 2754 0 0 . ½ . ½ ½ . ½ * 2 2637

Tal Memorial: Anand vs. Leko

One of the strongest chess tournaments ever assembled moved to Russia’s Red Square today. Viswanathan Anand demonstrated to the world that he is not satisfied to “rest on his laurels” but is willing to use whatever means necessary to defeat his challengers at the Tal Memorial. The first 21 moves are considered book.  It is very difficult to tell exactly where Leko went wrong and how Anand’s 30.h3 clinched the victory.  Please enjoy our current World Chess Champion at his finest.

[Date “2009.11.10”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “5”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Viswanathan Anand”]
[Black “Peter Leko”]
[ECO “D43”]
[WhiteElo “2788”]
[BlackElo “2752”]
[PlyCount “90”]

1. d4 d5{notes by Chris Torres} 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8.
Bg3 b5 9. Be2 Bb7 10. O-O Nbd7 11. Ne5 Bg7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bd6 a6 14. a4
e5 15. Bg4 exd4 16. e5 c5 17. Re1 Nxe5 18. Bxe5 O-O 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. Ne2
f5 21. Bh5 f4 22. Nxd4{a rarely played idea invented by Kasimdzhanov} cxd4 23. Re6 Bc8{23…Bc8 seems to be good enough to draw. Rf6 is the alternative which could lead to 24.Qe1  Rxe6  25.Qxe6  Qc7  26.Re1  d3  27.Re5  d2  28.Rf5  d1Q+  29.Bxd1  Rf8  30.Rxf8  Kxf8 which is complicated but equal} 24. Rg6+ Kh7 25. axb5 Rf6 26. Rxf6
Qxf6 27. Qc2+ Bf5 28. Qxc4 Rc8 29. Qd5 axb5 30. h3{The little move which changes it all. All of a sudden Anand is winning.}  Kh8{Rc7 is an alternative. However… if Anand continues 31.Ra8  Be6  32.Qd6 31. Qxb5 Rf8 32. Ra6 Rd7  33.Qc6  Re7  34.Ra6  d3  35.Qd6  Kg7  36.Bg4  d2  37.Qxd2 he will still win} 31. Qxb5 Rf8 32. Ra6 Qg7 33. Rd6{Anand uses fantastic technique for the remainder of the game to seal Leko’s fate.} d3 34. Qb6 Qe5 35. Bg6 d2 36. Bxf5 Qxf5 37. Qd4+ Kh7 38. Qxd2
Rf7 39. f3 h5 40. Rd5 Qg6 41. Qa5 Rg7 42. h4 Qb1+ 43. Kh2 Qxb2 44. Rxg5
Rxg5 45. Qxg5 1-0

Kramnik vs. Svidler: 2009 Tal Memorial

Below is Kramnik’s win over Svidler in a Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange Variation. A lot could be stated about the opening theory as Kramnik tried a new move successfully with 12. h4. However, I do not believe Kramnik’s courageous new move is to blame for Svidler’s failure. Instead, Svidler seemed to have forgotten that “Knight’s on the rim are dim” and attempted to spar with a world champion contender minus a Knight. I say minus a Knight due to the fact that Svidler moved his Knight to a6 on move 11 and then left it there to rot.

[Event “Tal Memorial”]
[Site “0:10:33-0:04:33”]
[Date “2009.11.08”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “4”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Svidler”]
[ECO “D85”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “4”]

1.d4 Nf6{notes by Chris Torres} 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Be3 c5 8.Rc1 Qa5 9.Qd2 O-O 10.Nf3 Bg4 11.d5 Na6 12.h4{Kramnik’s aggressive new move} f5{Svidler’s first missed opportunity to repost his Knight to c7} 13.exf5 Bxf5 14.h5 Rad8 15.hxg6 Bxg6 16.Bh6 Bxh6 17.Rxh6 Rf6 18.Ne5 Qa4{Svidler’s second missed opportunity to repost his Knight to c7} 19.Qe3 Qf4 20.Qxf4 Rxf4 21.Nxg6 hxg6 22.Rxg6+ Kf7 23.Rg5 Re4+{Svidler’s third missed opportunity to repost his Knight to c7} 24.Be2 Kf6{Svidler’s fourth missed opportunity to repost his Knight to c7} 25.Rh5 Kg6 26.g4 Rf8 27.Rd1 Rf6 28.Rh8 Kg7 29.Rd8 Rb6 30.f3 Re3 31.Rd3 Re5 32.Kf2 Rh6{? A bad mistake. Better was 33… b5 34. f4 Re4 35. Re3 Rxf4+ 36. Kg2 Kf7}33.Bf1 Rh2+ 34.Kg3 Rxa2 35.d6 exd6 36.R3xd6 Re7 37.R6d7  1-0

FIDE Top 100

Below is the FIDE top 100 list for November(source http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/).  Vugar Gashimov broke into the top 10 for the first time in his career. Born in 1986,  Mr. Gashimov  hails from Azerbaijan and is known for his extreme skill in one minute chess. Below is a recent example of his Brilliant play against American grandmaster Gata Kamsky:

[Event "Baku Grand Prix"]
[Site "Baku AZE"]
[Date "2008.04.28"]
[EventDate "2008.04.21"]
[Round "7"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Vugar Gashimov"]
[Black "Gata Kamsky"]
[ECO "C84"]
[WhiteElo "2679"]
[BlackElo "2726"]
[PlyCount "103"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5
7. Bb3 O-O 8. h3 Bb7 9. d3 d6 10. a3 Qd7 11. Nbd2 Rfe8 12. Nf1
Nd8 13. Ng3 Ne6 14. Ba2 c5 15. Bd2 Bf8 16. b4 h6 17. c4 Nf4
18. Re3 bxc4 19. dxc4 Ne6 20. Bb1 g6 21. Re1 Qc7 22. Bd3 Bg7
23. Rb1 Nd7 24. Ne2 Nd4 25. Nc3 Rec8 26. Rc1 Qd8 27. Nd5 Bc6
28. Bf1 Nf8 29. Nxd4 exd4 30. f4 Nd7 31. Qf3 Rcb8 32. Qg3 cxb4
33. axb4 a5 34. b5 Bxd5 35. cxd5 Nc5 36. e5 a4 37. Bb4 a3
38. Bxa3 d3 39. Bxc5 d2 40. Bxd6 Rb7 41. Red1 dxc1=Q 42. Rxc1
Rba7 43. Qb3 Ra1 44. Bc7 Qh4 45. Rxa1 Rxa1 46. Qf3 Qe1 47. b6
Qb4 48. d6 Qd4+ 49. Kh2 Rb1 50. b7 Rxb7 51. Qxb7 Qxf4+ 52. g3
1-0
FIDE Rating List November 2009 Top 100
Rk Se09 Name Title NAT YroB ap08 ju08 oc08 ja09 ap09 ju09 se09 Rating Gms
1 1 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 1975 2767 2777 2791 2796 2812 2813 2813 2810 10
2 4 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 1990 2765 2775 2786 2776 2770 2772 2772 2801 10
3 2 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 1969 2803 2798 2783 2791 2783 2788 2788 2788 0
4 3 Aronian, Levon g ARM 1982 2763 2737 2757 2750 2754 2768 2773 2786 13
5 5 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 1975 2788 2788 2772 2759 2759 2759 2772 2772 0
6 14 Gashimov, Vugar g AZE 1986 2679 2717 2703 2723 2730 2740 2740 2758 11
7 9 Gelfand, Boris g ISR 1968 2723 2720 2719 2733 2733 2755 2756 2758 11
8 12 Svidler, Peter g RUS 1976 2746 2738 2727 2723 2726 2739 2741 2754 17
9 6 Leko, Peter g HUN 1979 2741 2741 2747 2751 2751 2756 2762 2752 10
10 10 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 1977 2774 2788 2787 2771 2751 2751 2750 2750 0
11 7 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 1987 2751 2744 2751 2761 2756 2756 2757 2748 10
12 8 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 1969 2740 2781 2786 2779 2746 2703 2756 2739 13
13 13 Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 1983 2719 2718 2719 2726 2726 2727 2741 2739 5
14 17 Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 1983 2716 2728 2719 2733 2748 2733 2733 2736 13
15 11 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 1983 2711 2709 2737 2760 2753 2760 2742 2736 10
16 15 Wang, Yue g CHN 1987 2689 2704 2736 2739 2738 2736 2736 2734 27
17 24 Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 1983 2687 2716 2720 2693 2693 2716 2717 2729 15
18 20 Karjakin, Sergey g UKR 1990 2732 2727 2730 2706 2721 2717 2722 2723 12
19 21 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 1985 2752 2742 2731 2724 2725 2717 2721 2719 25
20 18 Shirov, Alexei g ESP 1972 2740 2741 2726 2745 2745 2732 2730 2719 18
21 22 Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 1983 2695 2708 2719 2717 2721 2716 2719 2719 0
22 26 Movsesian, Sergei g SVK 1978 2695 2723 2732 2751 2747 2716 2711 2718 16
23 23 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 1990 2632 2681 2716 2696 2684 2703 2718 2718 0
24 16 Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 1987 2686 2697 2704 2699 2701 2710 2735 2715 17
25 19 Alekseev, Evgeny g RUS 1985 2711 2708 2715 2718 2716 2714 2725 2715 7
26 36 Vallejo Pons, Francisco g ESP 1982 2684 2650 2664 2702 2688 2693 2696 2711 20
27 44 Tomashevsky, Evgeny g RUS 1987 2658 2646 2646 2664 2684 2689 2688 2708 21
28 42 Wang, Hao g CHN 1989 2689 2704 2736 2739 2696 2690 2690 2708 13
29 29 Short, Nigel D g ENG 1965 2660 2655 2642 2663 2674 2684 2706 2707 16
30 39 Navara, David g CZE 1985 2672 2646 2633 2638 2654 2687 2692 2707 9
31 25 Malakhov, Vladimir g RUS 1980 2689 2689 2675 2692 2709 2707 2715 2706 26
32 31 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam g UZB 1979 2681 2679 2672 2687 2695 2672 2702 2705 5
33 48 Almasi, Zoltan g HUN 1976 2674 2668 2663 2680 2685 2684 2685 2704 15
34 28 Bacrot, Etienne g FRA 1983 2705 2691 2705 2722 2728 2721 2709 2700 27
35 34 Akopian, Vladimir g ARM 1971 2673 2673 2679 2700 2696 2712 2698 2700 7
36 50 Adams, Michael g ENG 1971 2729 2735 2734 2712 2703 2699 2682 2698 12
37 30 Rublevsky, Sergei g RUS 1974 2695 2699 2702 2702 2702 2703 2703 2697 17
38 45 Nielsen, Peter Heine g DEN 1973 2629 2652 2662 2660 2668 2680 2687 2697 10
39 35 Jobava, Baadur g GEO 1983 2658 2665 2664 2669 2687 2684 2696 2696 0
40 27 Motylev, Alexander g RUS 1979 2666 2674 2672 2676 2677 2710 2710 2695 23
41 38 Kamsky, Gata g USA 1974 2726 2723 2729 2725 2720 2717 2692 2695 16
42 53 Vitiugov, Nikita g RUS 1987 2617 2616 2638 2687 2688 2681 2681 2694 24
43 43 Bologan, Viktor g MDA 1971 2665 2686 2682 2687 2690 2689 2688 2692 24
44 52 Volokitin, Andrei g UKR 1986 2684 2672 2659 2671 2671 2678 2681 2691 16
45 47 Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 1985 2623 2665 2678 2693 2700 2697 2685 2689 26
46 41 Miroshnichenko, Evgenij g UKR 1978 2642 2593 2632 2667 2680 2696 2690 2686 26
47 32 Bu, Xiangzhi g CHN 1985 2708 2710 2714 2702 2704 2702 2702 2682 22
48 46 Polgar, Judit g HUN 1976 2709 2711 2711 2693 2693 2687 2687 2680 6
49 37 Moiseenko, Alexander g UKR 1980 2650 2632 2678 2676 2690 2682 2694 2677 17
50 67 Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter g ROU 1976 2684 2692 2684 2675 2675 2675 2664 2677 14
51 54 Sargissian, Gabriel g ARM 1983 2643 2660 2642 2678 2660 2667 2678 2676 16
52 33 Onischuk, Alexander g USA 1975 2664 2670 2644 2659 2684 2699 2699 2672 18
53 56 Harikrishna, P. g IND 1986 2679 2668 2659 2673 2686 2679 2673 2672 16
54 68 Georgiev, Kiril g BUL 1965 2665 2671 2645 2634 2637 2645 2663 2672 13
55 62 Cheparinov, Ivan g BUL 1986 2695 2687 2696 2679 2678 2678 2667 2671 5
56 83 Efimenko, Zahar g UKR 1985 2660 2670 2680 2688 2682 2654 2654 2668 24
57 55 Sutovsky, Emil g ISR 1977 2630 2654 2651 2660 2660 2675 2676 2666 26
58 59 Kurnosov, Igor g RUS 1985 2593 2617 2606 2602 2658 2669 2669 2666 20
59 51 Najer, Evgeniy g RUS 1977 2627 2670 2682 2669 2669 2663 2681 2666 17
60 40 Ni, Hua g CHN 1983 2703 2705 2710 2709 2724 2701 2692 2665 35
61 57 Tiviakov, Sergei g NED 1973 2634 2645 2686 2684 2697 2674 2670 2664 34
62 63 Areshchenko, Alexander g UKR 1986 2650 2664 2664 2673 2657 2651 2667 2664 16
63 81 Landa, Konstantin g RUS 1972 2633 2615 2613 2626 2627 2655 2655 2664 16
64 74 Sasikiran, Krishnan g IND 1981 2679 2684 2694 2711 2682 2669 2661 2664 9
65 88 Smirin, Ilia g ISR 1968 2630 2637 2649 2647 2641 2650 2648 2662 16
66 69 Berkes, Ferenc g HUN 1985 2618 2645 2645 2651 2638 2647 2663 2661 21
67 93 Riazantsev, Alexander g RUS 1985 2638 2617 2656 2634 2635 2647 2646 2661 16
68 78 Roiz, Michael g ISR 1983 2659 2680 2677 2647 2635 2658 2658 2659 3
69 85 Krasenkow, Michal g POL 1963 2624 2639 2624 2620 2622 2631 2651 2656 19
70 90 Lastin, Alexander g RUS 1976 2622 2639 2651 2643 2650 2648 2648 2656 11
71 70 Pashikian, Arman g ARM 1987 2537 2564 2611 2621 2655 2650 2663 2656 11
72 71 Dreev, Alexey g RUS 1969 2657 2657 2670 2688 2668 2660 2662 2655 44
73 92 Baklan, Vladimir g UKR 1978 2647 2631 2625 2627 2618 2639 2646 2655 32
74 60 Avrukh, Boris g ISR 1978 2632 2656 2657 2645 2647 2641 2668 2655 7
75 Ganguly, Surya Shekhar g IND 1983 2614 2631 2603 2614 2625 2637 2634 2654 25
76 95 Fier, Alexandr g BRA 1988 2527 2558 2581 2590 2595 2604 2644 2653 28
77 100 Kazhgaleyev, Murtas g KAZ 1973 2617 2641 2640 2630 2626 2639 2643 2653 15
78 77 Fressinet, Laurent g FRA 1981 2656 2673 2676 2666 2664 2667 2658 2653 14
79 65 Meier, Georg g GER 1987 2560 2556 2558 2608 2641 2658 2664 2653 10
80 49 Grachev, Boris g RUS 1986 2610 2640 2653 2655 2652 2669 2684 2652 23
81 72 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 1992 2620 2630 2640 2646 2649 2670 2662 2652 21
82 82 Predojevic, Borki g BIH 1987 2651 2634 2615 2650 2652 2644 2654 2652 17
83 86 Van Wely, Loek g NED 1972 2676 2644 2618 2625 2622 2655 2650 2652 15
84 79 Sokolov, Ivan g BIH 1968 2690 2658 2650 2657 2669 2655 2657 2652 11
85 76 Milov, Vadim g SUI 1972 2690 2705 2681 2669 2659 2659 2659 2652 5
86 61 Timofeev, Artyom g RUS 1985 2664 2650 2670 2671 2677 2681 2668 2651 22
87 84 Postny, Evgeny g ISR 1981 2649 2661 2674 2652 2648 2647 2651 2650 26
88 Smeets, Jan g NED 1985 2578 2593 2604 2601 2626 2632 2642 2650 17
89 73 Fridman, Daniel g GER 1976 2640 2637 2630 2650 2646 2665 2661 2649 15
90 94 Seirawan, Yasser g USA 1960 2630 2634 2634 2634 2634 2646 2646 2649 1
91 Vescovi, Giovanni g BRA 1978 2617 2631 2635 2635 2631 2631 2636 2648 19
92 80 Beliavsky, Alexander G g SLO 1953 2641 2606 2619 2646 2640 2662 2656 2648 17
93 91 Zhigalko, Sergei g BLR 1989 2568 2583 2592 2587 2622 2621 2646 2646 0
94 66 Inarkiev, Ernesto g RUS 1985 2684 2675 2669 2656 2676 2675 2664 2645 21
95 Savchenko, Boris g RUS 1986 2569 2578 2648 2654 2655 2650 2638 2644 29
96 Khismatullin, Denis g RUS 1984 2584 2613 2606 2601 2601 2604 2614 2643 16
97 Socko, Bartosz g POL 1978 2644 2627 2631 2631 2637 2656 2637 2643 15
98 89 Kobalia, Mikhail g RUS 1978 2627 2618 2630 2634 2645 2645 2648 2643 9
99 Korobov, Anton g UKR 1985 2590 2590 2605 2613 2616 2623 2633 2642 14
100 58 Tkachiev, Vladislav g FRA 1973 2657 2664 2664 2657 2657 2650 2669 2642 14

Fremont Achiever Chess Team

Today was the start of the Fremont Achiever Chess Team. Our group will meet every Saturday from 1:00 until 3:00 at the Achiever Institute in Fremont. This program is aimed at the serious young chess player who aspires to improve his/her game through hard work and practice. Each week we will play one rated game as part of an ongoing tournament.  Below is a copy of Luke Zhao’s first USCF rated game. Congratulations to Luke on winning his first game.

[Event “Fremont Achiever Chess Team”]
[Site “Fremont (achiever)”]
[Date “2009.11.07”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Sui, Albert”]
[Black “Zhao, Luke”]
[Result “0-1”]
[PlyCount “106”]
[TimeControl “g30”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Na5 5. O-O Bb4 6. Nd5
Nxd5 7. exd5 c6  8. Bd3 cxd5 9. Nxe5 O-O 10. Qh5 g6 11. Qh3 Qg5 12. Re1 Qf6  13. c4 Bc5 14. Re2
dxc4 15. Nxc4 d5 16. Ne3 Bxh3 17. gxh3  Qg5+ 18. Kf1
Rae8 19. b4 Bxb4 20. Bb5 Re4 21. d3 Re5 22. Ng4 Qh4 23. Nxe5 a6 24. Bd7
Bc3 25. Rb1 Qf6 26. f4 g5  27. f5  Bxe5 28. Rg2
Rd8 29. Bxg5 Qd6 30. Be7+ Kh8 31. Bxd6 Bxd6 32. Ba4 b5 33. Bc2 b4 34. d4 Rb8
35. f6 Nc4  36. Re1 Na5 37. Re3 Nc4 38. Reg3 Bxg3
39. Rxg3 Re8  40. Ba4  Ne3+ 41. Ke1 Re6 42. Rg5 Rxf6
43. Bd7 Nf1 44. Rxd5 Nxh2 45. a4 b3 46. Kd1 b2
47. Kc2 Rf2+ 48. Kb1 Nf1 49. Ka2 Ng3 50. Bb5 Ne4 51. Bc6 Nc3+ 52. Ka3 b1Q
53. Rg5 Qb2# 0-1

FREMONT ACHIEVER CHESS TEAM

November 7th through January 30th

The Fremont Achiever Chess Team is brought to you by the Achiever Institute and the Torres Chess and Music Academy, a non-profit organization.

The Fremont Achiever Chess Team chess program meets every Saturday from 1:00 until 3:00, beginning November 7, 2009.

The Fremont Achiever Chess Team has a very special chess program designed and taught by nationally renowned chess instructor Chris Torres.  This class will provide experienced tournament players with instruction that will quickly increase their ability and understanding of chess. Participants will begin their afternoon by participating in an hour long chess class taught by Chris Torres. Students will then play 1 USCF rated chess game as part of the ongoing tournament and receive analysis of their play. All participants must be members of the USCF. If your child is not a member, your child can join or renew their USCF membership at the first meeting, or by going to uschess.org/

A USCF ID number is required in order to participate in the tournament.

For more information on the Torres Chess and Music Academy please visit chessandmusic.com.

The chess program will be offered every Saturday except for the dates listed below. The tuition for this program is $180 for ten weeks.

Checks should be made payable to The Achiever Institute.

43475 Ellsworth St. Fremont, CA 94539

(510) 226-6161 achieverinstitute.org

No refund will be given for unscheduled student absences.

There will be no class on 11/28, 12/26, and 1/2.

The last day of the Chess Team will be January 30, 2010.

PLEASE KEEP THESE DATES FOR YOUR RECORDS!!
FREMONT ACHEIVER CHESS TEAM

Name of child: ___________________________________________

Parents (Guardian) name(s):  ________________________________

Address: _______________________________________________

City: ___________________________   California Zip: __________

Telephone: (___)_________ E-mail: __________________________

School: ________________________________

Date of birth: ___/___/_____   Grade: _________________  

USCF ID: _________________   EXP: ___/___/_____  

This program is designed for tournament chess players.

1 $180.00 TOTAL PAID for ten weeks (11/7 – 1/30)

$_______ TOTAL PAID

I, hereby, as a Parent/Guardian of ______________________________ have read all the requirements and give my child permission to participate in the TCAMA Program held at the Achiever Institute. I recognize that this program is under the direction of the TCAMA and is no way connected to the Achiever Institute and only the TCAMA can be held legally responsible for this program.

Signature of parent or guardian: _______________________

Date: _____________

Please contact Chris Torres at (661) 699-8348 or at chesslessons@aol.com if you have any questions.

Please make the checks out to the Achiever Institute and mail them to:

The Achiever Institute

43475 Ellsworth St
Fremont, CA 94539

(510) 226-6161 achieverinstitute.org

Summer Chess Camp

   Today was the start of the TCAMA Summer Chess Camp at Mission San Jose Elementary School in Fremont.  So far we have over 30 students signed up for this three week camp. The camp which runs from 9:00 am until 3:00 pm features instruction from TCAMA chess coaches Joe Lonsadale, Tans Hylkema, and Chris Torres. The format includes lectures, rated play and one on one analysis. Its nice to see so many students from the rival schools of Mission San Jose Elementary and Weibel coming together to increase their chess skills and create lasting friendships. Below is a game from day 1 with light analysis:

[Event “Summer Camp”]

[Site “MSJE”]

[Date “2009.06.22”]

[Round “1”]

[White “Arun, Sagar”]

[Black “Zhang, Joseph”]

[Result “0-1”]

[PlyCount “22”]

[TimeControl “g90”]

1. e4 e5 {notes by Chris Torres}  2. Nf3 Nc6  3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 {The Fried Liver Attack is always a popular choice!} 5. exd5 Nd4 {This line is exceptionally tricky. NCO recomends 6. c3 b5 7. Bf1 Nxd5 8. cxd4 Qxg5 9. Bb5+ Kd8 10. Qf3 Bb7 11. 0-0 Rb8 12. Qg3 Qxg3  } 6. d6 {an alternative worth studying} Qxd6  7. Nxf7 [White feel for a trap. Bxf7 is correct] Qc6 8. Nxh8 {perhaps 0-0?} Qxg2 {Such a beautiful attack from a young player. This move leaves white with no real chances.} 9. Bf1 Qe4+ 10. Be2 Nf3+ 11. Kf1 Bh3+ 0-1

 

The Most Violent Chess Game Ever Played!

This fantastic game from 1880 is perhaps the most violent chess game ever played.

[Event "Jerome Gambit"]
[Site "England"]
[Date "1880.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "Joseph Henry Blackburne"]
[ECO "C50"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "28"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.Bxf7+
Kxf7 5.Nxe5+ Nxe5 6.Qh5+
{Note - d4 also regains a piece and deserves attention}
 g6 7.Qxe5 d6 8.Qxh8
Qh4 9.O-O Nf6 10.c3{Note - This is too slow as it does not stop Ng4.
 White should have tried Qd8
pinning the knight on f6.} Ng4 11.h3 Bxf2+ 12.Kh1 Bf5 13.Qxa8 Qxh3+
14.gxh3 Bxe4# 0-1

notes by Chris Torres

National Chess Champions to Host Summer Chess Camp

Mission San Jose Elementary School Summer Chess Camp

Come and train with the 2009 National Champions!

June 22 – June 25, June 29 – July 2, & July 6 – July 9

This class is brought to you by the Torres Chess and Music Academy, a non-profit corporation.

The Torres Chess and Music Academy, a 501c (3) non-profit organization, is pleased to be running a very special chess camp designed by nationally renowned chess instructor Chris Torres.  This camp will feature instructors with decades of chess teaching experience in a format that is fun, competitive and educational.  Attendees will receive the best training available and take part in USCF rated tournaments with awards given at the end of each week. 

This class will meet from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM, Mondays through Thursdays, June 22 to July 9 at Mission San Jose ES, 43545 Bryant St. Fremont, CA 94539.  The fee for this class is $170.00 for one week, $280 for two weeks, or $390 for all three weeks.

APPLY ONLINE AT CHESSANDMUSIC.COM

 

Name of child: _______________________________________   Grade:  ____  

Parents (Guardian) name(s):  _____________________________________

Address:  ____________________________________________________

City: ________________________________   California Zip:  __________

Telephone:  (___) _________   E-mail:  _____________________________

USCF ID: ______________   Rating:  _______ Date of Birth: ___/___/______              

 

 CHESS SKILL LEVEL—PLEASE CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX

1 Absolute Beginner-doesn’t even know the pieces                    

1 Beginner-knows the names of the pieces and that is about all

1 Intermediate Beg-knows how to play and how to castle           

1 Advanced Beginner-knows how to play & even knows en passant

1 Experienced-has taken chess lessons                                      

1 Tournament-has played more than 25 games in US Chess Federation tournaments

I AM PAYING

 

WE WILL BE GOING

 

$170

FOR JUST ONE WEEK

(please check which weeks attending)

 

$280

FOR TWO WEEKS    

JUNE 22 – JUNE 25

 

$390

FOR ALL THREE WEEKS    

JUNE 29 – JULY 2

 

$16

FOR A USCF MEMBERSHIP    

JULY 6 – JULY 9

 

$_______ TOTAL PAID

I, hereby, as a Parent/Guardian of the child named above have read all the requirements and give my child permission to participate in the TCAMA Program held at Mission San Jose ES. I recognize that this program is under the direction of the TCAMA and is no way connected to MSJE or the Fremont Unified School District and only the TCAMA can be held legally responsible for this program.

Signature of parent or guardian: _______________________   Date: __/__/__

To apply online, or for more information on the TCAMA, please visit CHESSANDMUSIC.COM, or contact Chris Torres at (661)699-8348, or chesslessons@aol.com.

The checks should be made payable to The TCAMA Inc. The fees for the chess program are nonrefundable after the class has begun. No refunds will be given for unscheduled student absences.

Please make the checks out to TCAMA Inc. and Mail them to:

The Torres Chess and Music Academy, 1832 Walnut Grove Ct., Oakley, CA 94561

National Scholastic Chess Champions

MSJE Chess Team 2008-2009
MSJE Chess Team 2008-2009

I have received several inquiries as to why this blog has not been updated as frequently. In answer to these questions, I have responded with a seemingly lame excuse of “devoting all my time to teaching future chess champions.”  Now for the proof:

 The chess players at the Mission San Jose Elementary School chess club achieved results beyond compare during the 2008-2009 school year. Winning a championship section at the Calchess State Scholastic Championships is always a result that speaks volumes about a chess program’s over-all quality. MSJE took first place in the k-3 championship section, the k-5 championship section and the k-6 championship. Since players can only compete in one team section, Mission San Jose talent was spread out rather than concentrated.  As impressive as sweeping the Calchess State Championships in 2009 was, placing first in the K-6 championship section at United States Chess Federation’s National Championship is, perhaps,  a more impressive feet.  According to the USCF, no other school from California has ever won this title.

   Congratulations to the players and their families who put forth a herculean effort. The coaching staff at MSJE includes Head Coach Joe Lonsdale,  the legendary Richard Shorman, and Chris Torres (President of the Torres Chess and Music academy.)

Annotated games and MSJE player features will be added soon.

Upcoming Chess Events

Dear Chess Parents,

 

   The next two weekends contain many exciting scholastic chess events that your children will benefit from attending.

 

   On Saturday April 25th, I will be hosting a chess tournament at Mission San Jose Elementary School, a TCAMA school in Fremont which just won the National Chess Championship in the K-6 division. This tournament will allow your children to practice for the upcoming state championships as well as compete and interact with the National Scholastic Champions. There will be a raffle at this tournament with the chance to win chess books and free lessons with TCAMA instructors.

Apply online by going to: http://fremontchess.com/onlineregistration/view?id=1

 

   On Sunday April 26th, I will be holding a special four hour intensive chess camp in Palo Alto for TCAMA students planning on attending the State Championships. This $40 class is designed to help ensure your child is ready for the intense level of competition met with during the state championships.

Apply Online by going to: http://chessandmusic.com/applications/view?id=1

 

   Finally, May first through third your child can compete in the Calchess State Championships. I consider this event to be the Super Bowl of Chess and recommend that all of our students attend. This is a great time to show school spirit and try for a team award as well as an individual achievement.

Apply by going to: http://www.calchessscholastics.org/

 

 

   I hope to see you at these events.

 

 

Sincerely,

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy (a 501c3 nonprofit organization)

Coach for MSJE the 2009 USCF K-6 National Chess Champions

Anand-Kramnik: Game 6 from the 2008 World Championship of Chess

The championship chess board in Bonn has become a form of torture for Vladimir Kramnik. After loosing game 6, Kramnik has just six games left and is down three full points. A loosing streak against a world champion is very hard to fix. In Kramnik’s case, achieving a win against Anand must seem like a desperate dream of freedom for a convict walking the “green mile.”

Below are my comments for game 6: 

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:52:33-0:51:33”]
[Date “2008.10.21”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[White “Anand”]
[Black “Kramnik”]
[ECO “E34”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 d5 5.cxd5 Qxd5 6.Nf3 Qf5 7.Qb3 Nc6 8.Bd2
O-O 9.h3 b6 10.g4 Qa5 11.Rc1 Bb7 12.a3 Bxc3 13.Bxc3 Qd5 14.Qxd5 Nxd5
15.Bd2 Nf6 16.Rg1 Rac8 17.Bg2 Ne7 18.Bb4 c5 19.dxc5 Rfd8 20.Ne5 Bxg2
21.Rxg2 bxc5 22.Rxc5 Ne4 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Nd3 Nd5 25.Bd2 Rc2 26.Bc1 f5
27.Kd1 Rc8 28.f3 Nd6 29.Ke1 a5 30.e3 e5 31.gxf5 e4 32.fxe4 Nxe4 33.Bd2 a4
34.Nf2 Nd6 35.Rg4 Nc4 36.e4 Nf6 37.Rg3 Nxb2 38.e5 Nd5 39.f6 Kf7 40.Ne4
Nc4 41.fxg7 Kg8 42.Rd3 Ndb6 43.Bh6 Nxe5 44.Nf6+ Kf7 45.Rc3 Rxc3
46.g8=Q+ Kxf6 47.Bg7+  1-0
3…Bb4 Kramnik employs the Nimzo-Indian again.

4. Qc2 Anand chooses the most popular reply.

9. h3 Here we go again. Another novelty from Anand. This seemingly innocent pawn move is the predecessor for a pawn thrust to g4.

10. g4 Anand takes the risky route by starting a kingside attack with the intention of  castling the long way.

11. Rc1 Anand plays the best move and threatens playing a3.

11…Bb7 Kramnik avoids Anand’s double discovered threats.

15…Nf6 A preventative move stopping Anand from playing e4. However, Kramnik should have  tried 15… Rfd8 16.Bg2 Na5 17.Bxa5 Nf4…

17…Ne7 Kramnik moves his knight so that it will not be pinned.

18. Bb4 Anand directs his bishop stop Kramnik from playing c5.

18…c5 Kramnik decides to play aggressively and push the pawn anyway.

20. Ne5 Anand is showing his world champion form.

21…bxc5 Kramnik not so much(see previous note.) This is an unfortunate mistake by the  Russian. Better was Nc6 22.Nxc6 Rxc6 23.Rg3 Rdc8 24.Rd3 Nd5.

22. Rxc5 Anand punishes inaccuracy by profiting a pawn.

24. Nd3 Obviously Anand is not going to play 24.Bxe7 Rc1 mate!

25…Rc2 A strong move but if Anand can activate his rook he will win.

26. Bc1 Anand plans on moving his king to d1.

29. Ke1. This move is very hard to understand. Possible improvements are the natural 29.Rg1  and 29.e3 Nc4 30.Re2 Rd8.

30…e5 Kramnik missed the strategic 30…a4. Unfortunately he spots this move at the wrong  time.

33…a4 This is a terrible mistake that Anand quickly punishes. Better would have been  33…Re8.

35. Rg4 Anand plays the second best move. The strongest continuation was 35.e4 Re8 36.Kf1  Nxe4 37.Bh6.

41. fxg7 Anand would have had an easier time if he had played 41.Rxg7+ Ke6 42.f7. However,  all roads lead to Rome for Anand.

 

Kramnik is Bewildered.
Kramnik is Bewildered.

Kramnik has, for all intensive purposes, lost this match. Perhaps, only now can he start playing  great chess as Spassky did against Fischer once the pressure had been lifted from the Russian’s shoulders.

Anand-Kramnik: Game 5 from the 2008 World Championship of Chess

Aruna and Viswanathan Anand
Aruna and Viswanathan Anand

Kramnik must be feeling miserable. Anand has beaten him with the black pieces once again. Now down two full points with 7 games to go, Kramnik must take considerable risks if he is to have any chance at becoming world champion again. Taking these risks could easily backfire and have the effect of causing this match to become a total blow-out. Below is game 5 of the 2008 World Chess Championship with my analysis:

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:12:33-0:45:33”]
[Date “2008.10.20”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “5”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Anand”]
[ECO “D49”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6 13.O-O Qb6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.Bxb5 Rg8 16.Bf4 Bd6 17.Bg3 f5 18.Rfc1 f4 19.Bh4 Be7 20.a4 Bxh4 21.Nxh4 Ke7 22.Ra3 Rac8 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Ra1 Qc5 25.Qg4 Qe5 26.Nf3 Qf6 27.Re1 Rc5 28.b4 Rc3 29.Nxd4 Qxd4 30.Rd1 Nf6 31.Rxd4 Nxg4 32.Rd7+ Kf6 33.Rxb7 Rc1+ 34.Bf1 Ne3 35.fxe3 fxe3  0-1

15…Rg8 This is where Anand deviates from game three. In game three Anand played 15…Bd6 and 16…Rg8. In game five he reverses the order.

17. Bg3 Had kramnik played 17.Bxd6 Qxd6 18.Rfd1 e5 19.Rxd4 Qxd4 20.Nxd4 Bxg2 and Anand would  have been able to repeat the position for a draw.

18. Rfc1 Kramnik had several interesting alternatives including my choice of 18.Nxd4 f4     19.Nxe6 fxe6 20.Qxe6+ Kf8 21.Qf5+. 

18…f4 This is the reason why Anand played f5.

22. Ra3 Kramnik misses the critical 22.Bxd7 Kxd7 23.b4.

27. Re1 Kramnik’s other choices of Rd1 and b4 deserve a second look. 27.Nxd4 Qxd4 28.Rd1 Nf6  29.Rxd4 Nxg4 30.Rd7+ Kf8 31.Rxb7 Rc1+ 32.Bf1 does not need explanation.

29…Nxd4 Kramnik blunders and looses the game. 29.Nd2 d3 30.a5 Rс2 31.Bxd7 would have been  preferable. Kramnik’s chances of winning the World Championship may have just evaporated.