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Anand Kramnik 2008: A Special Report Looking Back at the World Chess Championship 1858

Paul Morphy in 1858“Morphy…I think everyone agrees…was probably the greatest of them all.” (Bobby Fischer)

This years chess match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik takes place 150 years after one of the greatest world championship matches in history. In 1858, the two best chess players in the world, Paul Morphy and Adolph Anderssen, battled in Paris to determine which player was the greatest. When Morphy arrived in Paris to play Anderssen, he was stricken with a severe flu. His medical treatment was typical for the time period and included being leeched and drained of four pints of blood. Paul Morphy was so weak that he played the match from his hotel bed. Despite the disadvantage of playing while ill, Morphy won the match with a 7-2 score. Many chess writers refuse to admit that Morphy was the world champion. The logic these writers use to deny the fact is rooted in their attitude of European supremacy and is easily refuted by  chess historians. Below are the games from the match. If you are an improving chess player who has not seen these chess treasures, you have your homework.

[Event “It Paris”]
[Site “It Paris”]
[Date “1858.??.??”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “?”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Paul Morphy”]
[Black “Adolf Anderssen”]
[ECO “C52”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “144”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 6.d4 exd4 7.O-O
Nf6 8.e5 d5 9.Bb5 Ne4 10.cxd4 O-O 11.Bxc6 bxc6 12.Qa4 Bb6
13.Qxc6 Bg4 14.Bb2 Bxf3 15.gxf3 Ng5 16.Nd2 Re8 17.Kh1 Nh3
18.f4 Qh4 19.Qxd5 Nxf2+ 20.Kg1 Nd3 21.Bc3 Nxf4 22.Qf3 Nh3+
23.Kh1 Ng5 24.Qg2 Rad8 25.Rg1 h6 26.Raf1 Qh3 27.Qc6 Qd7 28.Qg2
Bxd4 29.Bxd4 Qxd4 30.Nf3 Qd5 31.h4 Ne6 32.Qg4 Qc6 33.Rg2 Rd3
34.Qf5 Red8 35.Qf6 Qd5 36.Qf5 Rd1 37.Rxd1 Qxd1+ 38.Kh2 Rd3
39.Rf2 Re3 40.Nd2 Re2 41.Qxf7+ Kh8 42.Ne4 Rxf2+ 43.Nxf2 Qd5
44.Ng4 Qxa2+ 45.Kg3 Qb3+ 46.Kh2 Qc2+ 47.Kg3 Qc3+ 48.Kh2 Qc6
49.h5 a5 50.Nf6 gxf6 51.Qxf6+ Kg8 52.Qg6+ Kf8 53.Qxh6+ Ke8
54.Qg6+ Kd7 55.h6 Qd5 56.h7 Qxe5+ 57.Kg1 Ng5 58.h8=Q Qxh8
59.Qxg5 Qd4+ 60.Kf1 a4 61.Qf5+ Kc6 62.Qc8 Kb5 63.Ke1 c5
64.Qb7+ Kc4 65.Qf7+ Kc3 66.Qf3+ Qd3 67.Qf6+ Kb3 68.Qb6+ Kc2
69.Qa7 Qc3+ 70.Ke2 a3 71.Qa4+ Kb2 72.Qb5+ Qb3 0-1

[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "02"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "C77"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "88"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.d3 Bc5 6.c3 b5 7.Bc2 d5
8.exd5 Nxd5 9.h3 O-O 10.O-O h6 11.d4 exd4 12.cxd4 Bb6 13.Nc3
Ndb4 14.Bb1 Be6 15.a3 Nd5 16.Ne2 Nf6 17.Be3 Re8 18.Ng3 Bc4
19.Nf5 Bxf1 20.Qxf1 Ne7 21.N3h4 Nxf5 22.Nxf5 Qd7 23.Bxh6 gxh6
24.Qc1 Bxd4 25.Qxh6 Re1+ 26.Kh2 Ne4 27.Bxe4 Rxe4 28.Qg5+ Kf8
29.Qh6+ Ke8 30.Nxd4 Qd6+ 31.Qxd6 cxd6 32.Rd1 Kf8 33.Rd2 Rae8
34.g4 R8e5 35.f3 Re1 36.h4 Rd5 37.Kg3 a5 38.h5 Kg8 39.Kf2 Re8
40.Kg3 Kh7 41.Kf4 Re7 42.Kg3 f6 43.Kf4 Re8 44.Kg3 Re7 1/2-1/2

[Event "Paris"]
[Site "Paris"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "C65"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "41"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.d4 Nxd4
5.Nxd4 exd4 6.e5 c6 {A weak move and the cause of all
subsequent embarrassment.} 7.O-O cxb5 8.Bg5 {Much stronger
play then taking the Knight at once.} Be7 {The only correct
reply. If ...h6 White can play either Re1 or exf6 and in each
case win with ease.} 9.exf6 Bxf6 {...gxf6 would have been
equally bad, for White's reply would have been Qxd4, with a
won game.} 10.Re1+ Kf8 11.Bxf6 Qxf6 12.c3 d5 13.cxd4 Be6
14.Nc3 a6 15.Re5 Rd8 16.Qb3 Qe7 17.Rae1 {Vigorously and ably
followed up.} g5 {Apprehensive of the advance of the f pawn.}
18.Qd1 Qf6 19.R1e3 Rg8 {Losing the game offhand; it was
previously, however, past all recovery.} 20.Rxe6 1-0

[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "04"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "C77"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "102"]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.d3 Bc5 6.c3 b5 7.Bc2 d5
8.exd5 Nxd5 9.h3 O-O 10.O-O h6 11.d4 exd4 12.cxd4 Bb6 13.Nc3
Ndb4 14.Bb1 Be6 15.a3 Nd5 16.Be3 Nf6 17.Qd2 Re8 18.Rd1 Bd5
19.Ne5 Qd6 20.Qc2 Nxd4 21.Bxd4 Bxd4 22.Nxd5 Qxe5 23.Nxf6+ Qxf6
24.Qh7+ Kf8 25.Be4 Rad8 26.Kh1 Bxb2 27.Rab1 Rxd1+ 28.Rxd1 Qxf2
29.Qh8+ Ke7 30.Qh7 Be5 31.Bf3 Qg3 32.Kg1 Qg6 33.Qxg6 fxg6
34.Bb7 Rb8 35.Bxa6 c6 36.Kf2 Bd6 37.Rd3 Kd7 38.Ke2 Ra8 39.Bb7
Rxa3 40.Bc8+ Kc7 41.Rd1 Ra2+ 42.Kf3 Bc5 43.Be6 Rf2+ 44.Kg3 Rf6
45.Rd7+ Kb6 46.Bg4 Bd6+ 47.Kh4 c5 48.Bf3 c4 49.Rxg7 Rf4+
50.Bg4 c3 51.g3 Rxg4+ 0-1
[Event "Paris"]
[Site "05"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "107"]

1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Nf6 3.d4 Nxd5 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bf5 6.Nf3 e6 7.Be3
Bb4 8.Qb3 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 Be4 10.Nd2 Bc6 11.Bd3 Nbd7 12.Qc2 h6
13.O-O O-O 14.Rae1 b6 15.h3 Qc8 16.Kh2 Kh8 17.Rg1 Rg8 18.g4 g5
19.f4 Qf8 20.Rg3 Rd8 21.Nf3 Bxf3 22.Rxf3 Qd6 23.Kg2 Nh5
24.fxg5 hxg5 25.gxh5 g4 26.hxg4 Rxg4+ 27.Kf1 f5 28.Qf2 Ne5
29.dxe5 Qxd3+ 30.Qe2 Qe4 31.Bf2 Qc6 32.Rd1 Rxd1+ 33.Qxd1 Qxc4+
34.Qd3 Qxa2 35.Rg3 Qc4 36.Qxc4 Rxc4 37.Rg6 Rc6 38.c4 a5 39.Ke2
Rxc4 40.Rxe6 Rc2+ 41.Kf3 a4 42.Rg6 Rc4 43.Rg1 a3 44.e6 a2
45.Ra1 Re4 46.Rxa2 Rxe6 47.Kf4 Rd6 48.Kxf5 Rd5+ 49.Kg4 b5
50.Ra8+ Kh7 51.Ra7 Rd7 52.Bg3 Rg7+ 53.Kh4 Rf7 54.Rxc7 1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "06"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "84"]

1.a3 e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e3 Be6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Be2
O-O 8.d4 Nxc3 9.bxc3 e4 10.Nd2 f5 11.f4 g5 12.Bc4 Bxc4 13.Nxc4
gxf4 14.exf4 Qe8 15.O-O Qc6 16.Qb3 Qd5 17.Rb1 b6 18.Qa2 c6
19.Qe2 Nd7 20.Ne3 Qe6 21.c4 Nf6 22.Rb3 Kf7 23.Bb2 Rac8 24.Kh1
Rg8 25.d5 cxd5 26.cxd5 Qd7 27.Nc4 Ke7 28.Bxf6+ Kxf6 29.Qb2+
Kf7 30.Rh3 Rg7 31.Qd4 Kg8 32.Rh6 Bf8 33.d6 Rf7 34.Rh3 Qa4
35.Rc1 Rc5 36.Rg3+ Bg7 37.h3 Kh8 38.Rxg7 Rxg7 39.Rc3 e3
40.Rxe3 Rxc4 41.Qf6 Rc1+ 42.Kh2 Qxf4+ 0-1
[Event "Paris"]
[Site "07"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "49"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} d5 {We consider this mode of evading
an open game as decidedly inferior to either ...e6 or ...c5,
(the French and Sicilian openings) though but some short time
ago it was in high repute, and was even adopted by
Mr. Staunton at the Birmingham meeting.} 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qa5
{...Qd8 is frequently played, but the move in the text is
preferable.} 4.d4 e5 5.dxe5 Qxe5+ 6.Be2 Bb4 7.Nf3 {Sacrificing
a pawn to obtain a more speedy development of his pieces.}
Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 Qxc3+ 9.Bd2 Qc5 10.Rb1 Nc6 11.O-O Nf6 12.Bf4 O-O
{Attempting to defend the c pawn would only have led him into
difficulty.} 13.Bxc7 Nd4 14.Qxd4 Qxc7 15.Bd3 Bg4 16.Ng5 Rfd8
17.Qb4 Bc8 {There appears to be no other mode of saving the
pawn; for if ...b6, White would have taken the h pawn with the
knight, and won a pawn.} 18.Rfe1 a5 19.Qe7 Qxe7 20.Rxe7 Nd5
{This is an instructive position} 21.Bxh7+ Kh8 22.Rxf7 Nc3
23.Re1 Nxa2 24.Rf4 Ra6 25.Bd3 1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "08"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "101"]

1.a3 {Notes by Lowenthal} e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5
5.e3 Be6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Be2 O-O 8.d4 Nxc3 9.bxc3 e4 10.Nd2 f5
11.f4 {Taking means to stop the further advance of the f pawn,
which he evidently apprehended might prove objectionable. The
range of the adverse King's Bishop is also contracted by this
move.} Qh4+ 12.g3 Qh3 13.Bf1 Qh6 14.c4 c6 15.c5 Bc7 16.Bc4 Nd7
17.O-O b5 18.cxb6 axb6 19.Qb3 Rfe8 20.Bb2 b5 21.Bxe6+ Qxe6
22.Qc2 Qd5 23.Rfc1 Ra6 24.a4 Rea8 25.axb5 Qxb5 26.Qc4+ Qxc4
27.Nxc4 Rxa1 28.Bxa1 Nf6 29.Bc3 Ra2 30.Bd2 Nd5 31.Kf1 Bd8
32.Ke1 Be7 33.Rb1 h6 34.Ne5 c5 35.dxc5 Bxc5 36.Rb5 Nxe3 {Very
prettily played.} 37.Rxc5 Ng2+ 38.Ke2 {If Kd1, Black would
equally have pushed on the e Pawn.} e3 39.Nf3 g6 40.Rd5 Kf7
41.Rd6 Kg7 42.h4 exd2 43.Rxd2 Ra4 {This mode of securing the
draw is highly ingenious; his opponent cannot prevent it, play
as he may.} 44.Kf2 Nxf4 45.gxf4 Rxf4 46.Rd4 Rxd4 47.Nxd4 Kf6
48.Ke3 g5 49.h5 Ke5 50.Nf3+ Kf6 51.Nd4 1/2-1/2
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "Paris m"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "B44"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "33"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.Nxd4 e6
5.Nb5 d6 {This is better than ...a6; but even now the King's
Bishop is shut in, and the Queen's Pawn rendered weak.} 6.Bf4
{Correctly played, compelling the advance of the e-Pawn, which
leaves the Queen's Pawn weak and unsupported.} e5 7.Be3 f5
{...a6 would have been sounder play, but even then the game
would have been in favor of the first player.} 8.N1c3 {A fine
conception.} f4 {Had Black played ...a6, White's reply would
still have been Nd5, with a winning game.} 9.Nd5 fxe3 10.Nbc7+
Kf7 11.Qf3+ Nf6 12.Bc4 {The attack is now irresistable.} Nd4
13.Nxf6+ d5 {If the Bishop had been interposed, White would
have taken it, checking; and on Knight retaking have played
Nd5 discovering check, and won without difficulty.} 14.Bxd5+
Kg6 {Had the Queen captured the Bishop, White would have taken
with Knight, discovering check, and have remained eventually
with a Pawn ahead and a winning position.} 15.Qh5+ Kxf6
16.fxe3 {Ne8+, seemingly a good move, is only in appearance,
as Black might have taken it when placed there; and on White
taking Queen, have answered with ...Bb4+, obtaining a winning
game.} Nxc2+ 17.Ke2 1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "10"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Adolf Anderssen"]
[Black "Paul Morphy"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "153"]

1.a3 e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e3 Be6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Be2
O-O 8.O-O Nxc3 9.bxc3 f5 10.d4 e4 11.Nd2 Rf6 12.f4 Rh6 13.g3
Nd7 14.Nc4 Bxc4 15.Bxc4+ Kh8 16.Ra2 Qe7 17.a4 Nf6 18.Qb3 c6
19.Be6 Re8 20.Bc4 Ng4 21.Rg2 Rb8 22.Be2 Nf6 23.c4 b6 24.Bb2
Qf7 25.Qc2 Be7 26.Bc3 Rg8 27.a5 Bd6 28.axb6 axb6 29.Ra1 g5
30.fxg5 Rxg5 31.Ra8+ Rg8 32.Qa4 Rxa8 33.Qxa8+ Qe8 34.Qxe8+
Nxe8 35.c5 Bc7 36.Bc4 Kg7 37.cxb6 Bxb6 38.Rb2 Bc7 39.Rb7 Kf6
40.Bb4 Rg6 41.Bf8 h5 42.Kf2 h4 43.gxh4 Rg4 44.h5 Rh4 45.h6
Rxh2+ 46.Kg1 Rh3 47.Bf1 Rg3+ 48.Kf2 Rg4 49.Bc4 Rh4 50.Bg8 Bd6
51.Bxd6 Nxd6 52.Rd7 Ne8 53.h7 Kg5 54.Re7 Nd6 55.Re6 Nc4
56.Rxc6 Nd2 57.Ke2 Rh2+ 58.Kd1 Nf3 59.Rc7 Kg6 60.d5 f4 61.exf4
e3 62.Re7 e2+ 63.Rxe2 Rh1+ 64.Kc2 Nd4+ 65.Kd2 Nxe2 66.Kxe2 Kg7
67.Ke3 Re1+ 68.Kd4 Rf1 69.Ke5 Re1+ 70.Kf5 Rd1 71.Be6 Rd4
72.Ke5 Rd1 73.f5 Rh1 74.f6+ Kxh7 75.Kd6 Ra1 76.Ke7 Ra7+ 77.Bd7
1-0
[Event "Paris m"]
[Site "11"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Paul Morphy"]
[Black "Adolf Anderssen"]
[ECO "C00"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "71"]

1.e4 {Notes by Lowenthal} e6 2.d4 g6 3.Bd3 Bg7 4.Be3 {The
student cannot fail of observing that in almost every French
game Mr. Morphy plays his Bishops to e3 and d3, and they
appear well placed here, and come into efficient action when
called upon. It is a novelty, however, in Chess play, and
will, doubtless, meet with attention at the hands of authors
on the game.} c5 5.c3 cxd4 6.cxd4 Nc6 7.Ne2 Nge7 8.O-O O-O
9.Nbc3 d5 10.e5 f6 11.f4 fxe5 12.fxe5 a6 13.Qd2 Nb4 14.Bg5
Nxd3 15.Qxd3 Bd7 16.Qh3 Qe8 17.Ng3 Rc8 18.Rxf8+ Qxf8 19.Rf1
Qe8 20.Qh4 Nf5 21.Nxf5 gxf5 22.Rf3 {This Rook is now well
posted, and ready for effective co-operation with the rest of
the attacking pieces.} Bb5 23.Rg3 {Rh3 would have been weak,
while by the move in the text White gains an undeniable
advantage in position.} Rc7 24.Bf6 f4 {This, says Mr. Morphy,
appears the only move to ward off the attack, if 24...Kh8
25.Rxg7 Rxg7 26.Nxb5 Qxb5 27.Qh6 Qd7 28.h4 Qf7 29.h5 Qc7 30.a3
Qd7 31.Kf2 Qf7 32.Kf3 Qc7 33.g3 Qd7 34.Qxg7+ Qxg7 35.h6 Qxf6
36.exf6 Kg8 37.Kf4 Kf7 38.Ke5 and must win.}- 25.Qxf4 Qf8
26.Nxb5 axb5 27.Qh6 Kh8 28.Rxg7 Rxg7 29.Kf2 {Contemplating the
exchange of pieces, and the bringing of the King to attack the
isolated Pawns; the game, however, was an easy one to win.}
Kg8 30.Qxg7+ Qxg7 31.Bxg7 Kxg7 32.Kf3 b4 33.g4 b6 34.h4 b5
35.Ke3 b3 36.a3 1-0

Anand-Kramnik: Game 4 from the 2008 World Championship of Chess

Anand-Kramnik Game 4
Anand-Kramnik Game 4

It was back to the “drawing” board in game 4 from Bonn, Germany.  Defending champion Viswanathan Anand played the white side in the solid Queen’s Gambit Declined. Kramnik ended up with the ubiquitous isolated queen’s pawn and allowed Anand no opportunities for victory.

3. Nf3 Anand decides to avoid a repeat of game 2’s Nimzo-Indian.

6…Nbd7 Kramnik does not play 6…c5 which would have lead to more exciting play with  higher winning chances for both players. Perhaps after yesterdays loss kramnik just  hoped to escape with a draw. Another possibility is that Kramnik still plans on   playing for a draw every game he is black. 
11…Bf5 Kramnik plays a rare move rather than the thematic 11…Bf6.

15…Qxf5 Kramnik has obtained an equal position.

18…Nc5 Kramnik makes a good choice. 18…d4 is tempting but after 19.Qxb7 dxe3 20.fxe3  Qxe3+ 21.Kh1 Ng5 22.b4 Anand has a favorable position.

21. Rd4 Many of my esteemed colleagues preferred 21.Rac1 Rad8 22.b4 Ne4 23.Qd3.

21…h5 Kramnik is trying to get his knight to e6.

24…g4 Finally Kramnik can get his knight to e6.

26…Ne6 Now Kramnik can play d4 and exchange his isolated pawn.

Nothing too exciting in this game. I suppose we can entitle it “The Bore From Round Four.”

    

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:45:33-0:50:33”]
[Date “2008.10.18”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “4”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Anand”]
[Black “Kramnik”]
[ECO “D37”]
[WhiteElo “2803”]
[BlackElo “2811”]
[PlyCount “2”]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 O-O 6.e3 Nbd7 7.a3 c5 8.cxd5 Nxd5 9.Nxd5 exd5 10.dxc5 Nxc5 11.Be5 Bf5 12.Be2 Bf6 13.Bxf6 Qxf6 14.Nd4 Ne6 15.Nxf5 Qxf5 16.O-O Rfd8 17.Bg4 Qe5 18.Qb3 Nc5 19.Qb5 b6 20.Rfd1 Rd6 21.Rd4 a6 22.Qb4 h5 23.Bh3 Rad8 24.g3 g5 25.Rad1 g4 26.Bg2 Ne6 27.R4d3 d4 28.exd4 Rxd4 29.Rxd4 Rxd4  1/2-1/2

Anand-Kramnik: Game 3 from the 2008 World Chess Championship

 In game 3 from the 2008 World Chess Championships, Viswanathan Anand put on a tactical display using his fiery attacking style to beat Vladimir Kramnik into submission. Below is the game that has put Anand ahead in the match:
Photograph copyright © 2008 Frederic Friedel
Photograph copyright © 2008 Frederic Friedel

   2…c6 Anand chooses the Slav again.

4. Nc3 Kramnik chooses not to play the exchange Slav as he did in game 1. We can assume he  did not reach the desired position in game 1 and is now willing to take his chances  to see what Anand’s preparations have sprouted.

6. Be3 Kramnik chooses the Meran set up.

8…a6 Anand shows he is ready to play tactical chess. Students can easily find thousands of  great games played from this position.

14…Bb7 Another novelty from Anand’s preparation. In previous games the bishop is placed on  a6 to defend the pawn on b5. Anand chooses to use his bishop for offense instead.

15…Bd6 Anand places his other bishop on the adjacent diagonal. Both bishops are aiming at  Kramnik’scastled king. This feature, together with the semi-open “g” file are  ingredients for a devastating attack on Kramnik’s king.

16…Rg8 Anand makes use of the semi-open “g” file
18. Bf4 Kramnik does not wish to leave his king defenseless by playing 18.Nd2. Perhaps he  feared the possibility of Anand playing 18…Ke7 clearing the 8’th rank so that his  a8 rook can move to g8. This is a pretty radical idea that I am sure we will see    in a future game between top level players.

 

19. Nxf4 Kramnik refuses to play passively and sacrifices a ppiece himself. Had Kramnik  played 19.Rxd4 then Anandwould have replied with 19…Kf8! 20.Bxd7 Rd8 21.Rad1 Rxd7  22.Rxd7 Bxg3 23.hxg3 Rxg3+ 24.Kh2 Bxf3 25.Qe3 Rg2+ 26.Kh3 Qxe3 27.fxe3 Rxb2 and  black’s position looks good.

22. Qd3 Kramnik makes another strong move and proves the worthiness of his sacrifice.

24…Rd8 Anand makes a world class move and puts his rook exactly where it needs to be.
25. Qe2 This is where Kramnik’s game starts to go sour. Better was 25.Qb3 Kh8 26.Rc1!

25…Kh6 Anand is playing amazing chess. His king will be perfectly safe on h6 for the   remainder of the game.

27. a4 Kramnik plays an interesting move here. To be honest, it will take more time on my   part to determine if this is a mistake or not. I wonder what Kramnik thinks of this  move now.

29. Ra3 This is definitely a mistake. Kramnik needed to play 29.Rd1 Rg1+ 30.Kd2 Rg2.

32. f3 I believe Rd3 was preferable.

33. Bd3 This move will give Kramnik nightmares for years. Had Kramnik played 33.Kb3 Rc1   34.a5 he would have been a lot better off.

33…Bh3 All of a sudden the World Champions are playing like patzers. I have a hunch that  33…Bxd3 34.Rxd3 Qc4 35. Rc3 Qxe2 is better. In fact after winning the queen Anand has mate in 12. Even with missing the pretty finish,   Anand has a win in the bag.

 
[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:02:33-0:03:33”]
[Date “2008.10.17”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]
[Black “Viswanathan Anand”]
[ECO “D49”]
[WhiteElo “2811”]
[BlackElo “2803”]
[PlyCount “82”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4
b5 8.Bd3 a6 9.e4 c5 10.e5 cxd4 11.Nxb5 axb5 12.exf6 gxf6
13.O-O Qb6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.Bxb5 Bd6 16.Rd1 Rg8 17.g3 Rg4 18.Bf4
Bxf4 19.Nxd4 h5 20.Nxe6 fxe6 21.Rxd7 Kf8 22.Qd3 Rg7 23.Rxg7
Kxg7 24.gxf4 Rd8 25.Qe2 Kh6 26.Kf1 Rg8 27.a4 Bg2+ 28.Ke1 Bh3
29.Ra3 Rg1+ 30.Kd2 Qd4+ 31.Kc2 Bg4 32.f3 Bf5+ 33.Bd3 Bh3 34.a5
Rg2 35.a6 Rxe2+ 36.Bxe2 Bf5+ 37.Kb3 Qe3+ 38.Ka2 Qxe2 39.a7
Qc4+ 40.Ka1 Qf1+ 41.Ka2 Bb1+ 0-1

TCAMA to Offer Chess at Former “Know Chess!” Schools

For immediate release:  
  As many parents abruptly found out this last week, Know Chess! has closed down due to unspecified reasons.  Thousands of young Bay Area chess players are now faced with the possibility of not having a school chess club. The Torres Chess and Music Academy is prepared to offer its services to save chess at these schools. 
   The Torres Chess and Music Academy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing instruction and opportunities to as many children as possible in the areas of chess and music. All of our instructors are highly accomplished educators who have a transcendent talent in their area of specialty. The TCAMA offers affordable classes throughout California and will custom design these programs to fit the needs of the schools. The Torres approach to teaching chess has been used since 1998 and is widely recognized as one of the main driving forces behind the sudden rise in the quality of scholastic chess in California. TCAMA schools have had the honor of winning the official K-6 State Chess Champions in the Calchess State Championships the last four years in a row. 
   More information on our program can be found at www.ChessandMusic.com
Sincerely,
Chris Torres
President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization

Anand-Kramnik: Game 2 from the 2008 World Chess Championship

The second game from the 2008 World Chess Championship ended in a draw. In an attempt to show off some of his preparation for playing white against the Slav(1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6), Anand decided to use 1.d4 instead of his favorite 1.e4. Kramnik avoided the technical Slav lines in game 1 and chose to use the Nimzo-Indian Defence(1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4) in game 2. Perhaps Kramnik is concerned about Anand’s knowledge in the Slav. This game becomes very complicated very quickly after Anand plays the surprising 4.f3 which is a favorite of Russian grandmaster Yuri Yakovich. Below is my analysis on the game:

4. f3 Anand is clearly playing for a win when he chooses this more complicated move. e4 tends to be a ver important square in such positions and the pawn on f3 exerts its influence there.

4…c5 Kramnik chooses a safer move than 4…c5.

5. a3 Welcome to the Saemisch Variation. This variation is highly theoretical and generally  continues the way our current game does.

8…f5 Kramnik chooses not to play the popular 8…Qa5.

9…Nd7 Kramnik avoids the more common 9…0-0 10.e4 or 9…f4 10.e4 fxe3 11.Bd3. In placing  the knight on d7 he prepares to move it to c5.

12. c6 Anand gets rid of a dead pawn by weakening his opponent’s pawn structure first.

14… Ba6 Kramnik wants to trade bishops so Anand no longer has the bishop pair.

15. c4  Anand could have played 15.Bxa6 Qxa6 and then 16.c4 0-0 17.0-0
 Anand could have also tried the exciting 15.Ng5 Bxf1 16.Rxf1 Nc5 17.Rf3.

16…Ng4 I really like this aggressive move. Kramnik proves to his critics that he does not  always choose the most “boring” approach.

17…Qe3+ Kramnik also could have played 17…Qb6 18.h3 Ne3 19.Qd2 Bxc4 20.Bxc4 Nxc4 21.Qg5   Qe3 22.Qxe3 Nxe3 and black has good compensation.

21…Ndf6 Another aggressive move by Kramnik. Now his rook on d8 is much better but at the  price of one pawn. 21…h5 is the solid choice Kramnik could have chosen.

27…e5 Kramnik is rolling now. Kramnik’s pawn sacrifice allowed him to get his pieces to much better squares than Anand finds his pieces in.

30. Rc3 I like Anand’s position after 30.Bxd3 Rxd3 31.Kg4 Rd4 32.Kf5 Rh5 33.Kg6

31. Bc2 Anand misses 31.Rf2 Rh6 32.h4 Ne6 which seems better.

32…Rd4 The two champions agreed to a draw. Its a shame as their seemed to be a lot of   chess left in this position. Keep in mind that Anand was in time trouble. Play

chessbase.com)
Anand-Kramnik Game 2 (source:chessbase.com)

could have continued:
33. c5 Nf4 34. Re3 Bc4 35. Rb2 Rh6 36. Kh2 Rg6 37. g3 Nd3 38. Bxd3 Rxd3 39.
Rxd3 Bxd3

 

 

[Event “Anand-Kramnik World Championship Match”]
[Site “0:08:00-0:13:00”]
[Date “2008.10.15”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “2”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Anand”]
[Black “Kramnik”]
[ECO “E25”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “64”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8.
dxc5 f5 9. Qc2 Nd7 10. e4 fxe4 11. fxe4 N5f6 12. c6 bxc6 13. Nf3 Qa5 14. Bd2
Ba6 15. c4 Qc5 16. Bd3 Ng4 17. Bb4 Qe3+ 18. Qe2 O-O-O 19. Qxe3 Nxe3 20. Kf2
Ng4+ 21. Kg3 Ndf6 22. Bb1 h5 23. h3 h4+ 24. Nxh4 Ne5 25. Nf3 Nh5+ 26. Kf2 Nxf3
27. Kxf3 e5 28. Rc1 Nf4 29. Ra2 Nd3 30. Rc3 Nf4 31. Bc2 Ne6 32. Kg3 Rd4 1/2-1/2

Know Chess Cancels Chess Classes

Know Chess has recently cancelled chess classes at a number of schools in the San Francisco Bay Area.  If you work for or your child attends one of these schools, the Torres Chess and Music Academy can help you get another chess club set up immediately.  Please contact us if your school is located in one of the cities below:

Peninsula: Atherton, Los Altos, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Carlos, San Mateo, Stanford, Woodside

Northern Peninsula: Belmont, Hillsborough, Pacifica, San Francisco

South Bay: Morgan Hill, San Jose, Santa Clara, Sunnyvale

East Bay: Alameda, Castro Valley, Danville, Dublin, Fremont, Hayward, Livermore, Milpitas, Newark, Oakland, Pleasanton, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, San Ramon, Union City 

 Information about our program can be found at www.ChessandMusic.com

Chris Torres

President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy a 501(c3) nonprofit organization

chesslessons@aol.com

(510) 789-9641

 

Anand-Kramnik Game 1 from the 2008 World Chess Championship

chessbase.com)
2008 World Chess Championship game 1 (source:chessbase.com)

Kramnik faced off against Anand in Game 1 of the World Chess Championship Match on October 14, 2008. The “Battle of Bonn” began with little surprise as Anand chose to play one of his main weapons referred to as the Slav Defense to the Queen’s Gambit Declined. The game concluded after move 32 when a draw was agreed to.

2… c6 Anand chooses to play the Slav.

4. cxd5 Kramnik decides to use boxing strategy. Rather than go for a knock-out in the first round, Kramnik feels his opponent out and takes little risk. This move also gave Kramnik little chance for a win against Anand as the resulting positions tend to be very symmetrical and drawish.

9… 0-0 Anand breaks symmetry but continues along the well known Slav Exchange mainline.

11… Rc8 Anand avoids the trouled pawn weaknesses occurs should he have played bxc3.

12… Ng4 Anand does not play Ne4 13.Qa3 bxc6 because it would lead to problems for Black due to the weakened pawn structure. White was victorious in Ivanov vs. Torres Los Angeles, 1992 when play continued 12…bxc6 13. Rc1 c5 14. 0-0 Ne4 15.Qa3 f6.

14. Qb4 To my knowledge this is an original idea by Kramnik. Previously, 14.Qa3 Rxc6 was played in  the game Reynaldo Vera and Ivan Morovic-Fernandez in 2002. This idea can be risky for white if play continues 14.Qa3 Rxc6 15.Qxa7 Qe7 16.O-O Rfc8.

14… Rxc6 I believe this was the best move of the game. Black takes the file and avoids the previously discussed pawn weakness. 14… bxc6 15.Bd6 would also leave Kramnik with a much better Bishop.

16… Rfxc8 For the sacraficed pawn, Anand gets two very active rooks and control of the open “C” file.

17… a5 Anand stops Kramnik from playing b4 and moves a weak pawn closer to wear it can be traded.

21. e4 Kramnik attempts to create some counter play.

23… Rc2 Anand gets a rook to the “seventh.”

25. Bxe5 Kramnik finally improves his Bishop.

25… Rxa2 Anand gets his sacrificed pawn back. A position such as this between players such as these will produce a draw. Kramnik began the match cautiously while Anand spiced up the game with a pawn sacrifice leading to significant initiative which in the end was enough to secure the draw.

 

 

[Event “Anand-Kramik World Championship”]
[Site “Bonn, Germany”]
[Date “2008.10.14”]
[EventDate “2008.10.14”]
[Round “1”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[White “Kramnik”]
[Black “Anand”]
[ECO “D14”]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Bf4 Nc6 6.e3 Bf5 7.Nf3 e6 8.Qb3 Bb4 9.Bb5 O-O 10.Bxc6 Bxc3+ 11.Qxc3 Rc8 12.Ne5 Ng4 13.Nxg4 Bxg4 14.Qb4 Rxc6 15.Qxb7 Qc8 16.Qxc8 Rfxc8 17.O-O a5 18.f3 Bf5 19.Rfe1 Bg6 20.b3 f6 21.e4 dxe4 22.fxe4 Rd8 23.Rad1 Rc2 24.e5 fxe5 25.Bxe5 Rxa2 26.Ra1 Rxa1 27.Rxa1 Rd5 28.Rc1 Rd7 29.Rc5 Ra7 30.Rc7 Rxc7 31.Bxc7 Bc2 32.Bxa5 Bxb3  1/2-1/2

Team Kramnik

For the 2008 World Chess Championship match in Bonn, Germany, Vladimir Kramnik has selected these players as his “Seconds.” I hope my readers will visit again tomorrow to view my coverage for game 1 of the 2008 World Chess Championship Match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik.

 
Name: Peter Leko
Date of birth: 09-08-1979
Country: Hungary
Current Rating: 2763
Description: Leko became the youngest grandmaster in the history of chess in 1994, at 14  years of age. Peter went on to win the Dortmund Super Tournament in both 1999 and  2002 defeating very strong opponents in both events. In 2004d Leko came extremely  close to becoming Hungary’s first World Champion. Leko lead Kramnik by one point  going into the final game of heir match. Kramnik won this game and retianed his   title by having a split score with Leko.
Notable Game:

[Event “Classical World Chess Championship”]
[Site “Brissago SUI”]
[Date “2004.01.09”]
[EventDate “?”]
[Round “8”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Vladimir Kramnik”]
[Black “Peter Leko”]
[ECO “C89”]
[WhiteElo “?”]
[BlackElo “?”]
[PlyCount “64”]

1. e4 {Notes by Raymond Keene.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4
Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d5 {The dangerous
Marshall Gambit, which Kramnik had avoided in earlier games.}
9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4
14. g3 Qh3 15. Re4 g5 {This was first played in the game
Petrosian-Averbakh, Moscow 1947. That game saw 16 Nd2 Bf5 17
Qe2 Nf6 18 Re5 Bxe5 19 dxe5 Ng4 and Black went on to win. The
point of 15 … g5 is to prevent Rh4, while 16 Bxg5 fails to
16 … Qf5.} 16. Qf1 Qh5 17. Nd2 Bf5 18. f3 Nf6 19. Re1 Rae8
20. Rxe8 Rxe8 21. a4 Qg6 22. axb5 {Starting on the road to
perdition. White must play 22 Ne4 Nxe4 23 fxe4 when 23
… Bxe4 24 axb5 axb5 (24 … Bd3 fails to 25 Bxf7+) 25 Bxg5
is in White’s favour. In this line Black must play 22 Ne4 Bxe4
23 fxe4 Nxe4 with approximate equality.} Bd3 23. Qf2 Re2
24. Qxe2 {This was played quickly in the evident belief that
White was winning. In fact White must now turn his thoughts to
survival by 24 bxa6 Rxf2 25 Kxf2 Qh5 26 Ke3 Bxa6 27 Rxa6 Qxh2
when there is still some fight left in the game. In this line
26 Kg1 loses to 26 … Qh3 27 a7 Bxg3 28 a8=Q+ Kg7 29 hxg3
Qxg3+ 30 Kh1 g4 31 Qxc6 Qh3+ 32 Kg1 g3} Bxe2 25. bxa6 Qd3 {The
key move which Kramnik and his team had underestimated before
the game. If now 26 a7 Qe3+ 27 Kg2 Bxf3+ 28 Nxf3 Qe2+ 29 Kg1
Ng4 30 a8=Q+ Kg7 31 Qxc6 Qf2+ 32 Kh1 Qf1+ 33 Ng1 Nf2
mate. Alternatively 30 Be3 Nxe3 31 a8=Q+ Kg7 32 Nh4 gxh4 33
Qxc6 hxg3 34 hxg3 Bxg3 and mate follows. White can also play
26 Bc4 which is refuted by 26 … Qe3+ 27 Kg2 g4 28 f4 Ne4 29
a7 Qf2+ 30 Kh1 Nxd2 31 a8=Q+ Kg7 and White is defenceless.}
26. Kf2 Bxf3 27. Nxf3 Ne4+ 28. Ke1 Nxc3 {Much stronger than 28
… Qxf3. This final sacrifice lays White’s position to
waste.} 29. bxc3 Qxc3+ 30. Kf2 Qxa1 31. a7 h6 32. h4 g4 {At
the end of the game Kramnik said, sportingly: “a beautiful
game that will be remembered in the history of chess.”} 0-1

 

Name: Sergey Rublevsky
Date of birth: 10-15-1974
Country: Russia
Current Rating: 2702
Description: Rublevsky won the 2004 Aeroflot Open, the 2005 Russian Championship and  Aerosvit Foros 2006. In addition, he has represented Russia in five Olympiads and  two World Team Championships. During his successful career, Sergey defeated both  Anatoli Karpov and Garry Kasparov in tournament games.
Notable Game:

[Event “20th European Club Clup”]

[Site “Izmir TUR”]

[Date “2004.10.04”]

[EventDate “2004.10.03”]

[Round “2”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Sergei Rublevsky”]

[Black “Garry Kasparov”]

[ECO “B30”]

[WhiteElo “2649”]

[BlackElo “2813”]

[PlyCount “113”]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. O-O Nge7 5. c3 a6 6. Ba4 c4
7. Qe2 b5 8. Bc2 Ng6 9. b3 Qc7 10. bxc4 Nf4 11. Qe3 bxc4
12. Ba3 Be7 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Na3 O-O 15. Rab1 f5 16. Qb6 Qxb6
17. Rxb6 fxe4 18. Bxe4 d5 19. Bc2 Neg6 20. Bxg6 Nxg6 21. Nc2
e5 22. Ne3 Bf5 23. Nxf5 Rxf5 24. Rfb1 Raf8 25. Rxa6 e4 26. Nd4
Rxf2 27. Ne6 R2f6 28. Nxf8 Rxa6 29. Nxg6 hxg6 30. Kf2 Rxa2
31. Ke3 Kf7 32. Rb7+ Kf6 33. Rb6+ Kf7 34. Rd6 Ra5 35. h4 g5
36. hxg5 Ke7 37. Rc6 Ra1 38. Kd4 Rd1 39. Kxd5 e3 40. Re6+ Kd7
41. Rxe3 Rxd2+ 42. Kxc4 Rxg2 43. Re5 Kd6 44. Ra5 Rg4+ 45. Kb3
Rg1 46. Kb4 Rb1+ 47. Kc4 Ke6 48. Ra6+ Kf5 49. g6 Rg1 50. Kb5
Ke5 51. c4 Rb1+ 52. Kc6 Rg1 53. Kd7 Rd1+ 54. Ke7 Rb1 55. Ra5+
Kd4 56. Kf8 Rb7 57. Rf5 1-0

 

Name: Laurent Fressinet
Date of Birth: 11-01-1981
Country: France
Current Rating: 2673
Description: Fressinet has a very impressive overall record of +161 -82 =243. However, he  still lacks the major tournament victories to make him a household name in the chess  world.
Notable Game:

[Event “Victor Ciocaltea Mem”]

[Site “Bucharest ROM”]

[Date “2001.03.13”]

[EventDate “2001.03.04”]

[Round “10”]
[Result “1-0”]

[White “Laurent Fressinet”]

[Black “Constantin Ionescu”]

[ECO “C65”]
[WhiteElo “2581”]

[BlackElo “2504”]

[PlyCount “51”]
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Bc5 5. Nxe5 Nxe5 6. d4
a6 7. Be2 Be7 8. dxe5 Nxe4 9. c4 O-O 10. Qc2 Nc5 11. Be3 c6
12. Nc3 Qc7 13. f4 a5 14. Rae1 f6 15. Kh1 fxe5 16. Bxc5 Bxc5
17. Bd3 exf4 18. Bxh7+ Kh8 19. Bg6 Qd8 20. Re5 d6 21. Qd1 f3
22. Rxf3 Bg4 23. Rh5+ Kg8 24. Bh7+ Kh8 25. Rxf8+ Qxf8 26. Bf5+
1-0

Team Anand

For the 2008 World Chess Championship match in Bonn, Germany, Viswanathan Anand has selected these players as his “Seconds.” I will review Vladimir Kramnik’s team in a later post.

Name: Peter Heine Nielsen
Date of birth: 05-24-1973
Country: Denmark
Current Rating: 2652
Description: A grandmanster with a very aggressive style who has won the Denmark Chess  Championship on several occasions. Peter has also served as the Second for Magnus Carlsen.
Notable Game:

[Event “Corus Chess Tournament: B Group”]

[Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]

[Date “2005.01.29”]

[EventDate “2005.01.15”]

[Round “12”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Peter Heine Nielsen”]

[Black “Sergey Karjakin”]

[ECO “D43”]

[WhiteElo “2648”]

[BlackElo “2599”]

[PlyCount “201”]
1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4
7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5 9. Be2 Nbd7 10. d5 cxd5 11. exd5 Nb6
12. dxe6 Qxd1+ 13. Rxd1 Bxe6 14. Nd4 a6 15. Bf3 O-O-O 16. O-O
Bc5 17. Nc6 Rxd1 18. Rxd1 Nbd7 19. Na5 Kd8 20. Nb7+ Kc8
21. Nxc5 Nxc5 22. Be5 Ncd7 23. Rxd7 Bxd7 24. Bxf6 Re8 25. h3
Re6 26. Nd5 a5 27. a3 b4 28. axb4 axb4 29. Bd4 c3 30. Nxb4
cxb2 31. Bxb2 Kd8 32. Nd3 Ke7 33. Nc5 Rb6 34. Ba3 Rb1+ 35. Kh2
Ra1 36. Bb4 Rb1 37. Ba3 Ra1 38. Bb4 Rb1 39. Nd3+ Ke8 40. Bd6
Rb6 41. Bc7 Rb5 42. Ne5 Ke7 43. Nc4 Be6 44. Bd6+ Kf6 45. Ne3
Rb2 46. Nd1 Rb3 47. Ne3 Rb2 48. Nd1 Rb3 49. Bh5 Kg7 50. Ne3
Rd3 51. Bc5 f6 52. Bd1 Rd2 53. Kg1 Ra2 54. Bd4 Rd2 55. Bc5 Ra2
56. Bc2 h5 57. Bd4 h4 58. Kf1 Kf7 59. Ke1 Kg7 60. Kd1 Kf7
61. Kc1 Kg7 62. Bb2 Kf7 63. Bd3 Ra4 64. f3 Ra8 65. Nc2 Rc8
66. Kb1 Bc4 67. Be4 Rd8 68. Kc1 Bd3 69. Bxd3 Rxd3 70. Nd4 Kg6
71. Kc2 Re3 72. Kd2 Re8 73. f4 gxf4 74. Nf3 Kh5 75. Ne1 Kg5
76. Bd4 Rd8 77. Ke2 Re8+ 78. Kf2 Re6 79. Nf3+ Kh5 80. Kg1 Ra6
81. Bf2 Ra1+ 82. Kh2 Ra2 83. Bxh4 Kg6 84. Be1 Kf5 85. Bc3 Ra3
86. Bd4 Rd3 87. Kg1 Ra3 88. Kf1 Ra2 89. Bc3 Ra3 90. Bd2 Ra2
91. Ke2 Ra3 92. Nd4+ Ke5 93. Nc2 Rb3 94. Ne1 Ke4 95. Nf3 Ra3
96. Bb4 Ra2+ 97. Nd2+ Kf5 98. Kf3 Ra4 99. Bc5 Ra1 100. Nb3 Kg5
101. Nxa1 1-0

 

Name: Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Date of birth: 12-05-1979
Country: Uzbekistan
Current Rating: 2679
Description: In 2004 he became FIDE World Champion by winning the knockout tournament in  Tripoli. At this event, he defeated Veselin Topalov, Michael Adams, Vassily  Ivanchuk, and Alexander Grischuk in match play. Kasimdzhanov was scheduled to play a  match with Garry Kasparov in 2005 but Kasparov withdrew before playing the match.
Notable Game:

[Event “FIDE World Championship”]

[Site “San Luis ARG”]

[Date “2005.10.01”]

[EventDate “2005.09.28”]

[Round “4”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Rustam Kasimdzhanov”]

[Black “Viswanathan Anand”]

[ECO “B90”]
[WhiteElo “2670”]

[BlackElo “2788”]

[PlyCount “75”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 Ng4
7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 g5 9. Bg3 Bg7 10. h3 Ne5 11. Nf5 Bxf5
12. exf5 Nbc6 13. Nd5 e6 14. fxe6 fxe6 15. Ne3 O-O 16. Be2 Qe7
17. O-O Rad8 18. Bh5 Kh8 19. Re1 d5 20. a4 Nc4 21. Nxc4 dxc4
22. Qg4 Qb4 23. Qxe6 Rd2 24. Rad1 Nd4 25. Qe4 Nf5 26. Be5 Rxf2
27. Bf3 Rd2 28. Bxg7+ Kxg7 29. Qe5+ Rf6 30. a5 Nh4 31. Qc7+
Rf7 32. Qe5+ Rf6 33. Bh5 Ng6 34. Bxg6 Rxd1 35. Rxd1 Kxg6
36. Qe4+ Kg7 37. Rd7+ Kg8 38. Qh7+ 1-0
 
Name: Radoslav Wojtaszek
Date of birth: 01-17-1987
Country: Poland
Current Rating: 2599
Description: Radoslav’s accomplishments include winning the 2004 World Youth Chess  Championships (U-18), the 2004 Cracovia Open with 7.5/9 and the Polish Open in 2005.
Notable Game:

[Event “WYCC 2004 – B18”]
[Site “Creta Maris Conference Hotel”]
[Date “2004.11.13”]
[Round “11.1”]
[White “Wojtaszek, Radoslaw”]
[Black “Sulashvili, Malkhaz”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “D45”]
[WhiteElo “2536”]
[BlackElo “2326”]
[PlyCount “113”]
[EventDate “2004.11.04”]

1. c4 c6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e3 Nf6 4. Qc2 e6 5. b3 Bd6 6. Bb2 O-O 7. Be2 Nbd7 8. Nc3
a6 9. d4 Qe7 10. O-O e5 11. cxd5 cxd5 12. dxe5 Nxe5 13. Rfd1 Be6 14. Nd4 Ba3
15. Bxa3 Qxa3 16. Qc1 Qxc1 17. Raxc1 Rac8 18. Na4 Rxc1 19. Rxc1 Rc8 20. Rxc8+
Bxc8 21. f3 h5 22. Kf2 Kf8 23. Ke1 Ke7 24. Kd2 g6 25. Bd1 Kd6 26. Bc2 Bd7 27.
Nc3 Nc6 28. Nce2 Ne8 29. Nxc6 bxc6 30. e4 dxe4 31. Bxe4 Nc7 32. Bd3 c5 33. Nc3
f5 34. f4 Be6 35. g3 Bf7 36. Na4 Nd5 37. Bc4 Be6 38. Nb2 Nc7 39. Bf1 Ke7 40.
Nc4 Bxc4 41. Bxc4 a5 42. Kc3 Ne8 43. Kb2 Nf6 44. Ka3 h4 45. gxh4 Nh5 46. Ka4
Nxf4 47. Kxa5 Kd6 48. Kb6 Nd5+ 49. Kb7 Ne3 50. Be2 c4 51. bxc4 Kc5 52. a4 Kb4
53. c5 Kxc5 54. a5 Nd5 55. a6 Nb6 56. a7 f4 57. h3 1-0
 
Name: Surya Shekhar Ganguly
Country: India
Current Rating: 2631
Description: Ganguly won the Indian National Championship four years straight from 2004 to  2007.
Notable Game:

[Event “FIDE World Cup”]
[Site “0:00:00-0:03:21”]
[Date “2005.11.28”]
[EventDate “2005.11.27”]
[Round “1”]
[Result “0-1”]
[White “Hikaru Nakamura”]
[Black “Surya Sekhar Ganguly”]
[ECO “C44”]
[WhiteElo “2710”]
[BlackElo “2432”]
[PlyCount “104”]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.e5 d5 6.Bb5 Ne4 7.Nxd4
Bd7 8.Bxc6 bxc6 9.O-O Bc5 10.f3 Ng5 11.f4 Ne4 12.Be3 Qb8
13.Qc1 Bxd4 14.Bxd4 c5 15.Bf2 Bb5 16.Rd1 Nxf2 17.Kxf2 Bc6
18.Nd2 Qb6 19.c4 d4 20.Qc2 O-O 21.f5 Rad8 22.Rf1 Ba8 23.Kg1 d3
24.Qc3 Rd4 25.Rf2 Re8 26.Re1 Qh6 27.Qa3 Qg5 28.g3 h5 29.Qxc5
h4 30.Qxd4 hxg3 31.Kf1 gxf2 32.Qxf2 Qg4 33.f6 gxf6 34.Re3 Qd1+
35.Qe1 Qxe1+ 36.Kxe1 fxe5 37.Rxd3 f5 38.Rd7 e4 39.Nb3 f4
40.Nd4 e3 41.Nf5 Kh8 42.Nh4 Kg8 43.Ng6 f3 44.Re7 Rxe7 45.Nxe7+
Kf7 46.Nf5 e2 47.Nd4 Kf6 48.Nb5 Ke5 49.Nxc7 Be4 50.Nb5 Bd3
51.b3 Ke4 52.Nc7 Bxc4 0-1

My Friends are Better Than Yours… Anand and Kramnik Get Seconds

In under 2 days Anand will play Kramnik!
In under 2 days Anand will play Kramnik!

   The upcoming 12 game World Championship match between Anand and Kramnik is creating internet rumors faster than Alexandra Kosteniuk makes blitz moves in China. Most of these rumors seem to be speculation on opening choices and who is going to be the “Second” for Anand and Kramnik. A “Second” refers to a chess players choice of another strong chess player to help him/her prepare for a particular opponent. Generally this early preparation focuses on finding new ideas and weaknesses in an opponent’s opening repertoire. The role of the Second was arguably much more important in the time before large chess databases and strong computer engines. With the onset of the computer dominated age of chess, we are also seeing match play that has a much shorter structure and therefor less games to try prepared innovations. The upcoming match between Anand and Kramnik is only scheduled for 12 rounds. I am confident that both Anand and Kramnik are capable of coming up with six very good ideas as to what to try with each color. For the upcoming Anand vs. Kramnik match, a Second’s primary role will likely be acting as the flashy Rybka yielding intimidator in a world champion contender’s entourage. Basically a “my friend is stronger than your friend” ornament meant to impress upon the chess world that the player that attracts friends/disciples with higher ratings must be the next chess messiah.
   So who have Anand and Kramnik chosen for this critical role? Viswanathan Anand’s Second is very likely to be the 2786 rated Grand Master from Norway, Magnus Carlsen. Born in 1990 in Tønsberg, Magnus played his first tournament at the age of eight and was coached at the Norwegian High School for Top Athletes by the country’s top player, Grandmaster (GM) Simen Agdestein. On 26 April 2004 Carlsen became a Grandmaster at the age of 13 years, 4 months, and 27 days, the third youngest Grandmaster age in history. Carlsen and Anand are reported to get along very well and have been seen dining together as well as reinacting scenes from Monty Python’s Flying Circus. If for no other reason, Magnus is a good choice because he will likely be able to keep Viswanathan Anand more relaxed than any other top ten rated player. Even still, it seems odd to have Anand’s Second be higher rated than Anand.
   Vladimir Kramnik’s Second is confirmed to be the 2747 former World Championship Match participant from Hungary, Peter Leko. Leko was born on September 8, 1979 in Subotica, Yugoslavia. He became a grandmaster in 1994 at the age of 14 years and in doing so became the youngest grandmaster ever. This choice makes sense for Kramnik as Leko’s style is very similar to Kramnik’s solid play. The choice seems a little odd in that from September 25-October 18, 2004 Leko was attempting to take the World Chess Champion title from Kramnik in a match of their own. Leko led by a point with just one game left to play. Kramnik managed to win the last game, tying the match 7-7 (+2 -2 =10), which entitled him to remain the reigning “classical” world champion.

1 day and 21 hours left until the World Chess Championship 2008 begins!

Alexandra Kosteniuk Takes the Gold in Blitz Chess

www.kosteniuk.com
http://www.kosteniuk.com
www.kosteniuk.com
http://www.kosteniuk.com
www.kosteniuk.com
http://www.kosteniuk.com

It appears as though chess has a new superstar. After taking the Women’s World Rapid Chess Championship and the Women’s World Chess Championship titles Alexandra Kosteniuk won gold in the 1st World Mind Sports Games Women’s Blitz Chess Individual event in Beijing, China. Under her father’s(Konstantin Vladimirovich Kosteniuk) coaching and guidance, Alexandra became a Woman Grand Master at age 14, an International Master at 16, and a Grand Master at 20. Her climb to the top started by winning the Girls U10 European Championship in Herculane in 1994, the Girls Under 12 European Championship in Rimavaska Sobota in 1996, and the Girls Under 12 World Championship in Minorca in 1996. At the age of 17, in 2001, she was runner up to Zhu Chen for the Women’s World Championship. In 2006, she won the Chess960 Women’s World Championship and still possesses the title. In September 2008, Alexandra became the 14th Women’s World Chess Champion after winning the final against Yifan Hou by 2.5 – 1.5.  In her free time, Alexandra enjoys appearing in films, fashion magazines, doing many product promotions, and walking the catwalk as a successful fashion model.

Below are some fantastic examples of Alexandra Kosteniuk’s phenominal chess abilities. The final game in the list is the sudden death blitz game Kosteniuk played to win the 1st World Mind Sports Games Womens Blitz Chess Individual event.
[Event “Ch World (cadets) (under 12) (g)”]

[Site “Cala Galdana (Spain)”]

[Date “1996.??.??”]

[EventDate “?”]

[Round “11”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Alexandra Kosteniuk”]

[Black “Nadezhda Kosintseva”]

[ECO “C29”]

[WhiteElo “?”]

[BlackElo “?”]

[PlyCount “135”]
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.f4 d5 4.fxe5 Nxe4 5.d3 Nxc3 6.bxc3 d4
7.Nf3 Nc6 8.Be2 Bc5 9.c4 O-O 10.O-O Qe7 11.Bf4 Re8 12.Qe1 Bf5
13.Qg3 Bg6 14.Rab1 Nb4 15.Rb2 Rab8 16.Re1 Nc6 17.Bf1 Nd8
18.Bg5 Qd7 19.Bxd8 Qxd8 20.Ng5 f6 21.Nf3 fxe5 22.Rxe5 Bd6
23.Rxe8+ Qxe8 24.Qf2 c5 25.Rb1 Bf4 26.Kh1 Be3 27.Qg3 b6 28.Ne5
Bf5 29.Be2 Rb7 30.Bf3 Re7 31.Bc6 Qh5 32.Bf3 Qe8 33.Bc6 Qh5
34.Bf3 Qg5 35.Bd5+ Kf8 36.Rf1 g6 37.Nc6 Qxg3 38.hxg3 Ke8
39.Nxe7 Kxe7 40.g4 Bd7 41.Rf7+ Kd6 42.Rxh7 g5 43.Bf3 a6 44.g3
Kc7 45.Be4 Kd6 46.Bf3 Kc7 47.Kg2 b5 48.Bd5 Kd8 49.Rh6 a5
50.Rb6 b4 51.Ra6 a4 52.Bc6 Bxg4 53.Bxa4 Bd2 54.Rc6 Ke7 55.Rxc5
Be6 56.Ra5 g4 57.Bb3 Bc3 58.c5 Bd7 59.Ra7 Kd8 60.Bd5 Bc8
61.Rg7 Bd2 62.c6 Bf5 63.Bc4 Bc8 64.c7+ Ke8 65.Rg8+ Kd7 66.Be6+
Kxe6 67.Rxc8 Kd7 68.Rd8+ 1-0

 

[Event “FIDE WCh Women KO”]

[Site “Moscow RUS”]

[Date “2001.12.07”]

[EventDate “2001.11.27”]

[Round “5.3”]

[Result “0-1”]

[White “Yuhua Xu”]

[Black “Alexandra Kosteniuk”]

[ECO “B31”]

[WhiteElo “2485”]

[BlackElo “2455”]

[PlyCount “124”]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 Nf6 6. e5 Nd5
7. Nc3 Nc7 8. Bxc6 dxc6 9. Ne4 b6 10. Nf6+ Kf8 11. Ne4 h6
12. h3 Kg8 13. b3 Ne6 14. d3 Kh7 15. Ng3 Nd4 16. Bb2 Be6
17. c4 Qd7 18. Re4 Nf5 19. Nf1 Rhd8 20. g4 Nd6 21. Re2 Nb7
22. Ng3 a5 23. a4 Kg8 24. Rd2 h5 25. Ng5 Bh6 26. f4 Bxg5
27. fxg5 hxg4 28. h4 Kg7 29. h5 Rh8 30. h6+ Kh7 31. Qf1 Rad8
32. Qf4 Rhf8 33. Rf1 Qc8 34. Qe3 Rd7 35. Ne2 Nd8 36. Nf4 Bf5
37. e6 fxe6 38. Qe5 Rg8 39. Rh2 Rd4 40. Bxd4 cxd4 41. Qxd4 Nf7
42. Qe3 Nxg5 43. Kf2 Nf3 44. Rg2 Rf8 45. d4 g5 46. Nh5 Bg6
47. Ng3 Rf4 48. Ne2 Re4 49. Qc3 Qf8 50. Kg3 Qxh6 51. Kf2 Qf8
52. Kg3 Qb8+ 53. Kf2 Nh4 54. Rg3 Kg8 55. Qd2 Nf3 56. Qc3 Rxe2+
57. Kxe2 Qxg3 58. Qe3 Kg7 59. d5 cxd5 60. cxd5 Qf4 61. Qxf4
gxf4 62. dxe6 Nd4+ 0-1

 

[Event “FIDE WCh Women KO”]

[Site “Moscow RUS”]

[Date “2001.12.13”]

[EventDate “2001.11.27”]

[Round “6.4”]

[Result “0-1”]

[White “Zhu Chen”]

[Black “Alexandra Kosteniuk”]

[ECO “A80”]

[WhiteElo “2497”]

[BlackElo “2455”]

[PlyCount “114”]
1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 e6 4. Bg2 d5 5. O-O Bd6 6. b3 Qe7
7. c4 c6 8. Bb2 O-O 9. Qc1 a5 10. Ba3 Na6 11. Bxd6 Qxd6 12. c5
Qe7 13. Ne5 Nd7 14. Nxd7 Bxd7 15. f4 b6 16. cxb6 Qb4 17. Qc3
Qxb6 18. Nd2 Rfc8 19. Rfc1 c5 20. Nf3 Rc7 21. e3 Rac8 22. Qd2
a4 23. Ne5 Be8 24. dxc5 Nxc5 25. bxa4 Bxa4 26. Rab1 Qa7
27. Qd4 Be8 28. Rc2 Qa3 29. Qc3 Qa4 30. Qb2 Qa6 31. Bf1 Qa7
32. Qd4 Qa3 33. Qc3 Qa4 34. Qb2 Qe4 35. Re1 g5 36. Bg2 Qa4
37. Rec1 Qa5 38. Qc3 Qa7 39. Qd4 Qa3 40. Qc3 Nb3 41. Qxb3 Qxb3
42. axb3 Rxc2 43. Rxc2 Rxc2 44. fxg5 Re2 45. Nf3 Rxe3 46. Nd4
Kf7 47. Bf1 Bd7 48. Kf2 Rc3 49. b4 e5 50. Nf3 Ke6 51. Nh4 e4
52. g6 hxg6 53. Nxg6 d4 54. h4 Rc2+ 55. Ke1 Rc1+ 56. Kf2 e3+
57. Kg1 Bb5 0-1

 

[Event “FIDE WCh Women KO”]

[Site “Moscow RUS”]

[Date “2001.11.28”]

[EventDate “2001.11.28”]

[Round “1.2”]

[Result “1-0”]

[White “Alexandra Kosteniuk”]

[Black “Jennifer Shahade”]

[ECO “B99”]

[WhiteElo “2455”]

[BlackElo “2295”]

[PlyCount “79”]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 cxd4 5. Nxd4 a6 6. Bg5 e6
7. f4 Be7 8. Qf3 Nbd7 9. O-O-O Qc7 10. g4 b5 11. Bxf6 gxf6
12. f5 Ne5 13. Qh3 O-O 14. Qh6 Kh8 15. Rg1 Rg8 16. Rg3 Bd7
17. Rh3 Rg7 18. g5 Qd8 19. Nce2 fxg5 20. fxe6 Ng4 21. Qh5 Nf6
22. Qf3 fxe6 23. Qb3 Qc8 24. Rc3 Qg8 25. Ng3 h5 26. Nc6 h4
27. e5 dxe5 28. Nh5 Bxc6 29. Nxf6 Bxf6 30. Rxc6 g4 31. Rxe6
Bg5+ 32. Kb1 Bf4 33. Rdd6 Rd8 34. Qd5 Rxd6 35. Qxd6 e4 36. Qd5
Bxh2 37. Qxe4 Qh7 38. Qc6 Qf5 39. Bd3 Qf3 40. Re8+ 1-0
[Event “Women’s World Championship”]

[Site “Nalchik RUS”]

[Date “2008.09.14”]

[EventDate “2008.09.14”]

[Round “6.1”]

[Result “0-1”]

[White “Yifan Hou”]

[Black “Alexandra Kosteniuk”]

[ECO “C90”]

[WhiteElo “2557”]

[BlackElo “2510”]

[PlyCount “96”]
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5
7. Bb3 O-O 8. a3 d6 9. c3 Bg4 10. d3 Na5 11. Bc2 c5 12. h3 Bd7
13. d4 Qc7 14. d5 c4 15. Nbd2 Nb7 16. Nf1 Nc5 17. g4 h5
18. N3h2 hxg4 19. hxg4 Qc8 20. f3 Nh7 21. Ng3 Bg5 22. Nf5 Qd8
23. Kg2 g6 24. Ng3 Kg7 25. Rh1 Rh8 26. Nhf1 Qf6 27. Be3 Bxe3
28. Nxe3 Ng5 29. Qe2 Rag8 30. Raf1 Qf4 31. Rxh8 Rxh8 32. Rh1
Rxh1 33. Nxh1 Nd3 34. Bxd3 cxd3 35. Qf2 d2 36. Ng3 Nxf3
37. Qxf3 Bxg4 38. Qf2 d1=Q 39. Nxd1 Bxd1 40. Qe1 Bf3+ 41. Kg1
f5 42. exf5 gxf5 43. Qf2 Kg6 44. b3 e4 45. c4 bxc4 46. bxc4
Qg5 47. c5 f4 48. cxd6 fxg3 0-1

 

[Event “Chess”]
[Site “Beijing”]
[Date “2008.10.05”]
[Round “17”]
[White “(RUS) Kosteniuk A.”]
[Black “(BUL) Stefanova A.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteTitle “GM”]
[WhiteElo “2525”]
[WhiteCountry “RUS”]
[BlackTitle “GM”]
[BlackElo “2548”]
[BlackCountry “BUL”]
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. c3 b5 7. Bb3 d6
8. d4 Bb6 9. a4 Bg4 10. h3 Bh5 11. Bg5 Rb8 12. axb5 axb5 13. Qd3 O-O
14. Nbd2 h6 15. Bh4 g5 16. Bg3 exd4 17. cxd4 Bg6 18. Qc3 Ne7 19. Rfe1
Ra8 20. Rxa8 Qxa8 21. d5 Nh5 22. Kh2 Nxg3 23. fxg3 Kh7 24. Nd4 Qa5 25.
N2f3 Qxc3 26. bxc3 Rb8 27. g4 b4 28. c4 Ra8 29. Nf5 Ng8 30. e5 dxe5
31. Nxe5 Bxf5 32. gxf5 Re8 33. Nd3 Rxe1 34. Nxe1 Ne7 35. g4 Bd4 36.
Nd3 Bc3 37. c5 Kg7 38. d6 cxd6 39. cxd6 Nc6 40. Ba4 Nd8 41. Kg2 Kf8
42. Nc5 Bd2 43. Kf3 Bf4 44. d7 Ke7 45. Ke4 Bd6 46. Nb3 f6 47. Kd5 Bg3
48. Nd4 Bd6 49. Nb3 Bg3 50. Na5 Be5 51. Nc4 Bg3 52. Nb6 Bc7 53. Nc8+
Kf7 54. Kc4 Ba5 55. Kb5 Bc7 56. Kxb4 Nb7 57. Bb3+ Kf8 58. Kb5 Nd8 59.
Bd5 Bf4 60. Kb6 Bg3 61. Na7 Ke7 62. Be6 Bf2+ 63. Ka6 Bxa7 1-0

Where I Was Ten Years Ago.

Thanks to Google’s ten year  anniversary, the famed search engine has added an option to have a google search  show the user what he or she would have seen ten years in the past. This feature also includes the cached pages from a decade ago. Below is the description of my chess activities from ten years ago taken directly from http://mebers.aol.com/chesslessons I challenge the readers of this blog to cross reference the accomplishments of the Weibel and Argonaut chess programs. Also, be sure to check out http://google.com to see what the other notable chess personalities were up to “back in the day.” To see current information on my chess activities, please visit http://ChessandMusic.com 

Chris Torres in 1998!
Chris Torres in 1998!

 

Below is the description of my chess activities from ten years ago:

The Chess Coach

Teacher of Champions

I am Chris Torres, a scholastic chess coach who lives in San Jose California. I am the Supervisor of Instructors for Success Chess and also teach private lessons. Currently, I am the head coach for Warm Springs(Fremont), YoYo Chinese School (Fremont), and Challenger Schools(Pomeroy/Santa Clara, and Sunnyvale campuses), and a teacher at the prestigious Weibel Chess Club (Fremont). I also teach at Argonaut(Saratoga) and Gomes School (Fremont). My students have many success stories including both team and individual national and state championships. As a chess coach, I aspire to introduce children to the wonderful game as well as give them a taste of success. Students range from kindergartners to sixth graders. If you are interested in expanding a child’s logic, self-esteem, and creativity please email me at chesslessons@aol.com to find out the rates for private, semi-private, and group lessons.

5 Days Until the 2008 World Chess Championships in Bonn, Germany

   Anand and Kramnik both enjoy playing the Petroff Defense(1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6) and I would be very surprised not to see it used in their 2008 World Championship Chess Match. Both players know the theory very well in this opening, so any game they play could lead to new ideas for the world to use.
   In the game below, Kramnik plays 17… Qf5 in order not to repeat a loss he had suffered against Anand when he used 17… Bf5. Anand’s choice for move 24 seems odd and could be inaccurate if you are playing for a win. 24.Rxe7 Rxe7 25.dxe7 Nf6 seems more natural and White maintains a small edge. However, Anand’s 24. dxe7 is very interesting and he used a great deal of his time finally deciding on this move. Kramnik responded very quickly with 24… f6 and seems to have a well conceived plan as to how to take the advantage from his opponent. In fact, by the time Kramnik plays 29… c5 he is considered to be winning by all my chess engines. Don’t be fooled by your computer’s later assessment however. I have seen many esteemed chess players proclaiming various ways for Kramnik to win the endgame. After Anand plays 42. Kf2 there is no opportunity for Kramnik to turn his advantage into a win. Kramnik does his best to entice a blunder from his opponent but Anand will have none of that. I have spent many hours studying the endgame from this game and I would encourage any serious student of the game to do the same. 
[Event “WCh”]
[Site “Mexico City MEX”]
[Date “2007.??.??”]
[White “Anand,V”]
[Black “Kramnik,V”]
[Round “3”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2792”]
[BlackElo “2769”]
[ECO “C42”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4
d5 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. O-O Be7 8. c4 Nb4 9. Be2
O-O 10. Nc3 Bf5 11. a3 Nxc3 12. bxc3 Nc6 13. Re1
Re8 14. cxd5 Qxd5 15. Bf4 Rac8 16. Qa4 Bd7 17. Qc2
Qf5 18. Qxf5 Bxf5 19. Bb5 Bd7 20. d5 Ne5 21. Bxd7
Nxd7 22. Bxc7 Rxc7 23. d6 Rxc3 24. dxe7 f6 25. Rad1
Rc7 26. Nd4 Ne5 27. f4 Nc6 28. Nxc6 bxc6 29. Rd6
c5 30. Ree6 c4 31. Rc6 Rexe7 32. Rxc4 Rxc4 33. Rxe7
Ra4 34. Rb7 h6 35. f5 Rxa3 36. Kf2 h5 37. g3
a5 38. Ra7 a4 39. h4 Ra2+ 40. Kf3 a3 41. Ke3
Ra1 42. Kf2 Kf8 43. Kg2 a2 44. Kh2 Ke8 45. Kg2
Kd8 46. Kh2 Kc8 47. Kg2 Kb8 48. Ra3 Kb7 49. Ra4
Kb6 50. Ra8 Kc5 51. Ra7 Kd5 52. Ra4 Ke5 53. Ra5+
Ke4 54. Kh2 Kf3 55. Ra3+ Kf2 56. Ra4 Kf1 57. Kh1
Ke1 58. Kg2 Kd1 59. Ra7 Rc1 60. Rxa2 Rc2+ 61. Rxc2
Kxc2 62. Kf3 Kd3 63. g4 hxg4+ 64. Kxg4 Ke4 65. Kh5
Kxf5  1/2-1/2

Unfair Criticism of Kramnik

Tonight I attempt to defend Vladimir Kramnik from those who cast stones at the former World Chess Champion. I believe the upcoming 2008 World Chess Championship will be an exciting event played between two outstanding chess players who are wonderful ambassadors for the game of chess. Below are my opinions about the three most common critical myths that haunt Kramnik.

1) Kramnik plays “boring” chess.

   Kramnik has a very solid style that sometimes receives criticism for being boring. The fact that he can draw at will as black actually makes hims very exciting to admire in chess matches. If he gets ahead of Anand in the match, Anand will have to try radical ideas to make a come back. In this way, Kramnik’s solid play actually inspires exciting games.

2) Kramnik consults a computer in the bathroom.

   This is simply not true. From what I’ve seen there’s no conclusive evidence to support cheating by Kramnik, just circumstantial tid-bits that seem important out of context and are perpetuated by Topalov’s fans.

3) Kramnik refuses to recognise Anand as the World Chess Champion.

   Those critical of Kramnik enjoy taking his comments in the interview quoted below out of context. Perhaps to some deranged minds creating controversy where it does not exist adds excitement to the match.

EURO: You reach arguable better results during matches then in tournaments. Traditionally, the World Champion title was to be won in matches. A challenger had to beat the reigning World Champion in the direct fight in order to become the new World Champion. The only historical exception was the situation just after the end of the Second World War, when Alexander Aljechin had died during his reign and so a tournament was played.

KRAMNIK: You can call me an old- fashion guy, but I still believe that the real chess championship is actually a match between the best players, not a tournament. So that is going to be the match which will take place between me and Vishy Anand this autumn in Bonn. The tournament in Mexico which you are asking me about was from my point of view a huge compromise.

The problem was that the situation around the World Champion title was still difficult even after my unification match against Top alov. There was a need to find an acceptable compromise. After the unification my aim was to come back to a final match contest for the world champion crown under the umbrella of FIDE. In all the years after defeating Kasparov I felt this responsibility. Anything else would not have been in accordance with chesshistory, and also not with the desire of the overwhelming majority of chess fans all over the world.

It was always my goal to end the unhappy period when the World Chess Federation organised their ridiculous knock-out or round robin tournaments for the title. The problem was that the tournament in Mexico had already been agreed and I was informed that if I had refused to play there, the event would not have taken place at all. This would have ended in another impasse. So in order not to cause another split I, in the end, agreed to compromise and played the tournament, which FIDEcalled World Championship. The truth is I did not win in Mexico, the winner was Anand, and I will compete against him this year in the real contest for the chess crown. I attach ten times more attention to the coming match in Germany – consequently this event is ten times more important to me than the tournament in Mexico. 

EURO: So d o you consider Vishy Anand to be the World Champion or not?

KRAMNIK: It is not a question of simply yes or no. Anand won the tournament, which was called the World Championship Tournament, and I competed in that tournament as well. The I nternational C hess F ederation FIDE agreed to do it this way, so I have no right not to consider him the World Champion. A question is, however: what is the value of such a title? Similary I considered Kasimdzhanov to be a FIDE Champion, after winning the knock-out tournament in Libya. However I did not consider him to be the real champion. He had won a tournament and by FIDE’s definition he was a FIDE World Champion . But the value of this title was lower compared to the classical title won in a one-to-one match by Champions like Lasker, Spasski , Kasparov or me. The winner of the match Kramnik -Anand won’t be World Champion only from a legal point of view , he will be considered to be the World Champion and best chess player by the entire public.

The interview was published in the magazin “Weekly Euro”.

Kramnik vs. Anand 2008 (preview game revisited)

Cathy Rogers
source:Cathy Rogers

Seven Days until the Anand vs. Kramnik 2008 World Championship Match. I am revisiting a game they played in 2007 at the request of several fans of my blog.

Kramnik-Anand 9/13/2007 was a Moscow variation of the Semi-Slav Defense. The Moscow variation which starts after 5…h6 can lead to very sharp play especially because Anand gambits a pawn by playing 6. Bh4. This game was identical to a 2006 game between Radjabov and Anand for 16 moves. Then Kramnik played 17. Qh5. Anand answers by sacrificing an exchange to achieve a position where he obtains a powerful knight and an extra pawn with move 21. Rxd6. If Kramnik had played 29. Qg5 play would have continued 29…Ne2 30. Kh1 Qh2 31. Kh2 Rh8 32. Qh4 Rh4#. Another example of the difference between the chess elite and the rest of the world. The resulting end game shows how a powerfully placed knight can equal a rook. Kramnik missed 35 Qh6! after 35…Qd6 36 Qxg5 f6 37 Qg8 Rd8 38 Qh7 Rd7 39 Qh4. After running computer analysis on that line I feel Kramnik would have had much better winning chances.  

 
[Event “WCh”]
[Site “Mexico City MEX”]
[Date “2007.09.24”]
[Round “10”]
[White “Kramnik, V.”]
[Black “Anand, V.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “D43”]
[WhiteElo “2769”]
[BlackElo “2792”]
[PlyCount “81”]
[EventDate “2007.09.13”]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5
9. Be2 Bb7 10. O-O Nbd7 11. Ne5 Bg7 12. Nxd7 Nxd7 13. Bd6 a6 14. Bh5 Bf8 15.
Bxf8 Rxf8 16. e5 Qb6 17. b3 O-O-O 18. bxc4 Nxe5 19. c5 Qa5 20. Ne4 Qb4 21. Nd6+
Rxd6 22. cxd6 Nd7 23. a4 Qxd6 24. Bf3 Nb6 25. axb5 cxb5 26. Bxb7+ Kxb7 27. Qh5
Nd5 28. Qxh6 Nf4 29. Kh1 Qd5 30. f3 Rd8 31. Qg7 Rd7 32. Qf8 Ne2 33. Rfe1 Nxd4
34. Red1 e5 35. Rac1 Qd6 36. Qg8 f6 37. Rc8 a5 38. h3 a4 39. Qe8 Kb6 40. Rb8+
Ka5 41. Ra8+ 1/2-1/2

Bakersfield Chess Teacher

Here is a nice recomendation I received from a distinguished Disctrict Superintendent. The Torres Chess and Music Academy  offers schools in California the very best chess experience possible. For more information please visit http://www.ChessandMusic.com

 

8 July 2008

 

Letter of Recommendation for  Chris Torres

 

For the past 2 years Chris Torres has worked with Vineland School District on building its chess program. He has worked both as an instructor for all

5th grade students (4 classrooms) and as an after school coach.  I say without hesitation that

 he did an excellent job. 

 

I found Chris Torres to be an excellent instructor with solid classroom management skills.   He taught the students very well thought out chess lessons.  He was punctual and very conscientious about his duty.  He has a passion for chess which rubbed off on the students.  But most of all he had good rapport with the students.  The students liked going to chess.  They felt good about themselves when they played it. 

 

Overall, I believe you would be very fortunate to have Chris Torres as a chess instructor.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Adolph Wirth

District Superintendent

Bakersfield Chess Tournaments

Date Title Location Address
October 25 Fall Chess Classic Sunset Elementary 8301 Sunset Blvd. Bakersfield CA 93307
November 29 Thanksgiving Chess Extravaganza University Square 2000 “K” Street Bakersfield CA 93301
December   No Tournament Scheduled          
January 31 Super Bowl of Chess American Elementary 800 Verdugo Lane Bakersfield CA 93312
February 21 Presidential Chess Challenge Thorner Middle School 5501 Thorner Street Bakersfield CA 93306
March 21 Kern County Scholastic Chess Championships La Vina Middle School 1331 Browning Rd. Delano CA 93215
April tba            
May tba            

 

 

Dear Chess Coach,
 
   The Fall Chess Classic is coming up on October 25th at Sunset Elementary School. I sincerely hope that your team is able to attend to help us continue a fine Bakersfield tradition.
   This year I have introduced some changes to the structure and rules of the chess tournaments in order to bring us up to the same standards that are being used at USCF National Events. One change I have made is in regards to sections and team trophies.This year teams will be competing for team trophies in two sections per age group rather than one cumulative age group score. I believe that a cumulative score for a team across several sections imposes a penalty on teams that have players in the highest section. This does not serve the chess community well and will have the effect of discouraging strong players.  I have also increased the rating floor in several sections to bring our section levels closer to what tournament directors in other areas use. I believe this will give all chess players a better chance at competitive games and also cause an overall increase in the ratings of our scholastic chess players. A third change I have made is making it mandatory that all chess players in the seventh grade or above record their games. Hopefully, we can bring this requirement down to 4th grade in the near future. I have made this change because:
 
1) I do not believe we should be holding our children to a lower standard than what is required for children outside of Kern County.
 
2) This will greatly increase the probability that tournament directors are making correct judgements on the chess boards.
 
3) I hope to bring a USCF National Championship Event to Bakersfield in the near future.
 
In order to bring a National Championship tournament to Bakersfield we would need a large tournament staff,  start-up capital, experienced tournament directors, a strong relationship with theUSCF, and a large student population. I believe my organization has all of this. Players from all over California would have the much deserved “home field advantage” against the tournament field of about 2,500 participants. In order for this dream to become a reality we need to continue hosting tournaments of the same size and increase the prestige of our tournaments by adhering to the high standards set in other regions. Please help to make this happen by having your players attend as many of our tournaments as possible this year.
 
Sincerely,
Chris Torres
President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy:a 501(c)3 non profit organization
(661)699-8348

Torres Chess and Music Academy, Inc. Presents:

The Fall Chess Classic Chess Tournament

At Sunset Elementary School

Saturday, October 25, 2008

The Fall Chess Classic is sponsored by Vineland School District, Sunset Elementary School & TCAMA, Inc.

Where: Sunset Elementary School When: 9 AM – 5 PM What: Scholastic Chess Tournament 5SS – G/30

Team: 8 Sections as listed below

K – 1, K – 3 U 500, K – 3 CHAMP, K – 6 U 700, K – 6 CHAMP, K – 8 U 800, K – 8 CHAMP, K – 12

Individual: 8 Sections, Same as Team

An Adult Section will be run separately, see BakersfieldChess.com for info

Trophies:

Trophies are awarded to top 10 individuals in each section. The team awards for top 3 teams. A team consists of top 4 scorers and must include at least 2 members. Players in grade 7 or higher must record their chess moves or their team score will be penalized.

USCF Rated Swiss Format:

All players must be U.S. Chess Federation (USCF) members. Register for USCF at http://main.uschess.org or pay an additional $17 for 12 & under; $19 for 15 and under; $25 for 16 to 24.

5 round Swiss System – Everyone plays 5 games against players with approximately the same number of score after each round. All sections will be Game in 30. Sets and boards provided. Clocks may be used for Grades K-3 and must be used for Grades 4-12. A limited number of clocks will be provided. Please bring clocks.

Round Times: Opening Ceremony 9:45 AM. Rounds: 10:00 AM, 11:30 AM, 12:45 PM, 2:00 PM; 3:15 PM.

Awards immediately following (approx. 4:30 PM). Continental breakfast and lunch will be available at site.

Entry Fees:

$15 entry fee for entries received on or before 10/18/08 $25 entry fee after 10/18/08 or at site.

Make check payable to: TCAMA or APPLY ONLINE at http://www.bakersfieldchess.com/onlineregistration

Preregistration Check In Until 9:30 AM Only. ½ Pt. Byes will be available for all but Final Round.

Late Registration will be from 8:30 AM to 9:15 AM only. Players who register after 10/18 /08 will be allowed to play all rounds as long as they are registered by 9:15 AM.

Directions: Sunset Elementary School, 8301 Sunset Blvd., Bakersfield, CA 93307-9289

From Freeway 99, take Freeway 58 East (approximately 7 miles) to Highway 184 South (Weedpatch Highway) towards Lamont. Take 184 South (approx. 8-1/2 miles) to Sunset Blvd. Proceed approx. 1/10 miles; Sunset Elementary School is on the Right. Tournament is in Multi-Purpose Room (Cafeteria)

Information: Contact Chris Torres at 661-699-8348. Financial aid is available upon request.

E-mail: Chesslessons@aol.com

Website: http://www.BakersfieldChess.com or http://www.ChessandMusic.com

– – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

1 Entry Fee $15.00 (Must be postmarked by 10/18/08)

1  Annual fee for USCF membership: $17 for 12 & under; $19 for 13 to 15; $25 for 16 to 24

1 Late Registration Fee after 10/18/08 – $25

Total $ _________

Please include all fees (inc. USCF fees) in one check payable to TCAMA.

MAIL TO: TCAMA

1832 Walnut Grove Ct.

Oakley, CA 94561

OR APPLY ONLINE AT BAKERSFIELDCHESS.COM

Name: __________________________________________________________

Address: ______________________________________________________

City: _______________________ CALIFORNIA Zip: _________

Birth Date: ____/____/____ Phone: (___) ______________ E-Mail: ______________________________

School: __________________________________________________ Grade: ____

USCF ID #: ___________________________ USCF Rating: ________________ Exp Date: __/__/__

SECTION – Please check the section you wish to play in

 

K – 1

 

K – 6 U 700

 

K – 8 CHAMP

 

K – 3 U 500

 

K – 6 CHAMP

 

K – 12

 

K – 3 CHAMP

 

K – 8 U 800

   

Please check only one if a ½ Pt. Bye is requested in Rd. 1 ___, Rd. 2 ___, Rd. 3 ___, or Rd. 4___ NA in Final Rd.

 

I request that my child, (named above) be permitted to participate in the 10/25/08 Chess event. I fully understand that it is my (or my representative’s) responsibility for supervising my child during this event. Should it be necessary for my child to have medical treatment while participating in this event, I hereby give the supervisory personnel permission to use their judgment in obtaining medical services for my child, and I give permission to the physician selected by such personnel to render medical treatment deemed necessary and appropriate. I, as parent or representative of this child, hereby release, discharge, indemnify, and hold harmless the TCAMA, Vineland School District, Sunset Elementary School, Chris Torres and their employees, volunteers or agents, and/or staff, from any claims arising out of, or relating to, any injury that may result to said individual while participating in this event. I, as a parent or representative of this child, hereby waive any rights to the taking and use of photographs, (including posting

on BakersfieldChess.com, ChessandMusic.com or any promotional material) or any other recorded material, including video and audio taken during this chess tournament. I, as a parent or representative of this child, hereby consent to the publication of this child’s individual tournament results/scores.

Parent/Guardian Signature: ________________________________________ Date: __/__/__

Print Name: ________________________________________ Relationship ________________

ADULT TOURNAMENT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE ON BAKERSFIELDCHESS.COM

Rybka Proves It Is Still The Best

Congratulations to Rybka's creator, IM Vasik Rajlich, for raising the bar on the competition.
Rybka's creator, IM Vasik Rajlich

Rybka finished first in the 16th ICGA World Computer Chess Championship held in Beijing, China with a score of 8/9 with no losses. For much of the tournament Hiarcs was keeping pace with Rybka but when the two engines played, Rybka was victorious. The other key game for Rybka was against  Junior (2006 World Computer Chess Champion.) In this game Rybka seems to be aiming for a Kan or Taimanov Sicilian with the early a6 move. Junior responds with an early c3 and the game quickly becomes of interest to all players who enjoy the Kan, Paulsen, or Taimanov Sicilians.  Below is a list of all the past champions, followed by the 2008 results and the Junior vs. Rybka game. For more information on the World Computer Chess Championships please visit http://www.cs.unimaas.nl/icga/ and http://www.grappa.univ-lille3.fr/icga/event.php?id=37

   History of the World Computer Chess Championship

Event # Year Location Winner
1 1974 Stockholm Kaissa
2 1977 Toronto Chess 4.6
3 1980 Linz Belle
4 1983 New York, NY Cray Blitz
5 1986 Cologne Cray Blitz
6 1989 Edmonton, Canada Deep Thought
7 1992 Madrid, Spain ChessMachine (Gideon)
8 1995 Hong Kong Fritz
9 1999 Paderborn, Germany Shredder
10 2002 Maastricht, Netherlands Deep Junior
11 2003 Graz, Austria Shredder
12 2004 Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel Deep Junior
13 2005 Reykjavík, Iceland Zappa
14 2006 Torino, Italy Junior
15 2007 Amsterdam, The Netherlands Rybka
16 2008 Beijing, China Rybka

 

Results of the 2008 World Computer Chess Championship

Rank Program Origin Hardware Score Games SOS SoDOS
1 Rybka flag USA Cluster, 40 cores 8.0 9 37.0 31.25
2 Hiarcs flag GBR Intel Skulltrail, 8 x 4Ghz 7.0 9 38.0 26.00
3 Junior flag ISR Intel Dunnington, 12 x 2.67Ghz 6.0 9 39.0 22.00
4 Cluster Toga flag DEU Cluster, 24 cores 5.5 9 39.5 19.75
5 Shredder flag DEU Intel Core 2, 8 x 3.16Ghz 4.5 9 40.5 14.75
6 Falcon flag ISR Intel Core 2, 2 x 2.1Ghz 4.0 9 41.0 13.00
7 Jonny flag DEU Cluster, 16 cores 4.0 9 41.0 10.25
8 Sjeng flag BEL Intel Core 2, 4 x 2.8Ghz 3.5 9 41.5 10.50
9 The Baron flag NLD AMD Opteron 270, 4 x 2Ghz 2.5 9 42.5 7.50
10 Mobile Chess flag CHN Nokia 6120c 0.0 9 45.0 0.00
  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1
0
1 Rybka   1 = = 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 Hiarcs 0   1 = 1 1 1 1 = 1
3 Junior = 0   1 = = 1 = 1 1
4 Cluster Toga = = 0   = 0 1 1 1 1
5 Shredder 0 0 = =   1 = = = 1
6 Falcon 0 0 = 1 0   = 0 1 1
7 Jonny 0 0 0 0 = =   1 1 1
8 Sjeng 0 0 = 0 = 1 0   = 1
9 The Baron 0 = 0 0 = 0 0 =   1
10 Mobile Chess 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[Site “Beijing, China”]
[Date “2008.10.04”]
[Round “10”]
[White “Junior”]
[Black “Rybka”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 a6 3. c3 e6 4. d4 d5 5. e5 Bd7 6. dxc5 Bxc5 7. Bd3 Qc7 8. O-O
Ne7 9. Re1 Ng6 10. Nbd2 Qb6 11. Nd4 Nc6 12. N2b3 Ngxe5 13. Nxc5 Qxc5 14. Bf4
Nxd3 15. Qxd3 O-O 16. Qg3 Nxd4 17. Bd6 Qb6 18. cxd4 Rfc8 19. Be5 g6 20. Qf4 Qd8
21. Re3 Rc2 22. Rh3 f5 23. Rg3 Be8 24. h4 Qe7 25. Rc1 Rac8 26. Rxc2 Rxc2 27. h5
Bf7 28. a3 b5 29. Bd6 Qd8 30. h6 Qf6 31. Bc5 Be8 32. Qb8 Kf7 33. Qd6 Rc1+ 34.
Kh2 Kg8 35. Re3 Qh4+ 36. Rh3 Qf6 37. b4 Re1 38. f4 Re4 39. Qb6 g5 40. fxg5 Qf7
41. Kg1 Rg4 42. Qd8 f4 43. Rf3 Qg6 44. Be7 Qb1+ 45. Rf1 Rxg2+ 46. Kxg2 Qe4+ 47.
Kg1 Qe3+ 48. Rf2 Qg3+ 49. Kf1 Qh3+ 50. Ke2 Qe3+ 51. Kd1 Qd3+ 52. Rd2 Qb1+ 53.
Ke2 Qe4+ 54. Kf1 Qf3+ 55. Ke1 Qh1+ 56. Kf2 Qh2+ 57. Kf3 Qg3+ 58. Ke2 Qe3+ 59.
Kd1 Qb3+ 60. Rc2 Qd3+ 61. Kc1 Qxa3+ 62. Kb1 Qb3+ 1/2-1/2

Kramnik vs. Anand

Just ten days until the Anand vs. Kramnik World Chess Championship match of 2008!

Tonight I present another preview game for the upcoming World Chess Championship match between Viswanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik. The game I chose is a recent example of the two contenders going head to head in a major event.  My analysis is above the game that was played at the Corus tournament in 2007.  Enjoy!

chessbase.com)
Kramnik vs. Anand (source:chessbase.com)

10…Ra7 Anand starts to mix it up early. 10… Be4 is a lot more natural and common in the Catalan.

16. a3 Kramnik’s invention. This move serves to limit Anand’s bishop on the queen-side.

22…Nc4 Perhaps Anand should have tried 22… Bc4 23. Nxc4 Nxc4 and Anand has a knight to harass Kramnik with.

25…c6 Anand’s pawn had been under attack at c7. However, moving forward allows Kramnik to control the d8 square with his Bishop.

26. Rd1 is real trouble for Anand due to the fact that Kramnik’s Bishop forces Anand to place a rook on d7 rather than d8.

28. Rd1 Now Kramnik controls the d file.

30. f4 Is a very interesting move by Kramnik. 30. Qd4 forms a nice battery on the d file and is what most strong players would play. However, Kramnik must feel he wants his queen leading the charge on the d file.

30… Re6 Anand attempts to punish Kramnik’s last move by forcing his rook to retreat. Even with the retreat, Kramnik will still control the open file.  

32. Qd4 Kramnik reveals his intentions of having the queen lead down the d file.

36. e5 Kramnik unleashes his bishop on g2. Another way of activating the bishop would have been moving it to h3.

43. a4 Kramnik delivers a knock-out blow to Anand with his a pawn.  

 

[Event “Corus A”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee NED”]
[Date “2007.??.??”]
[White “Kramnik,V”]
[Black “Anand,V”]
[Round “6”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2766”]
[BlackElo “2779”]
[ECO “E06”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3
O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. Qxc4 b5 9. Qc2
Bb7 10. Bd2 Ra7 11. Rc1 Be4 12. Qb3 Nc6 13. e3
Qa8 14. Qd1 Nb8 15. Ba5 Rc8 16. a3 Bd6 17. Nbd2
Bd5 18. Qf1 Nbd7 19. b4 e5 20. dxe5 Bxe5 21. Nxe5
Nxe5 22. f3 Nc4 23. Nxc4 Bxc4 24. Qf2 Re8 25. e4
c6 26. Rd1 Rd7 27. Rxd7 Nxd7 28. Rd1 Qb7 29. Rd6
f6 30. f4 Re6 31. Rd2 Re7 32. Qd4 Nf8 33. Qd8
Rd7 34. Rxd7 Qxd7 35. Qxd7 Nxd7 36. e5 fxe5 37. Bxc6
Nf6 38. Bb7 exf4 39. gxf4 Nd5 40. Kf2 Nxf4 41. Ke3
g5 42. Bxa6 Kf7 43. a4 Ke7 44. Bxb5 Bxb5 45. axb5
Kd7 46. Ke4 Ne2 47. Bb6 g4 48. Bf2 Nc3+ 49. Kf5
Nxb5 50. Kxg4 Ke6 51. Kg5 Kf7 52. Kf5 Ke7 53. Bc5+
 1-0

World Computer Chess Championships 2008

Kasparov vs. Deep Blue

   On 9/28/2008 the 16’th World Computer Chess Championships began in Beijing, China. The IGCA has scheduled an eleven round accelerated swiss tournament format for the top  chess engines in the world to compete for the the title of World Computer Chess Champion 2008. The accelerated swiss structure strikes me as odd being that there are only ten competing chess programs.  The principle of a Swiss tournament is that each player will be pitted against another player who has done as well (or as poorly) as him or herself. The first round is seeded according to rating. Players who win receive a point, those who draw receive half a point and losers receive no points. Win, lose, or draw, all players proceed to the next round where winners are pitted against winners, losers are pitted against losers, and so on. In subsequent rounds, players face opponents with the same (or almost the same) score. No player is paired up against the same opponent twice however. This is where the organizers of the 16’th World Computer Chess Championships are going to run into trouble. With only ten competitors and eleven rounds, it will be impossible to follow a swiss format. The schedule of the chess events have been taken off the the IGCA website and I expect them to alter the pairings and tournament schedule. Obviously this should have been done before the tournament started.

   My criticism of the tournament structure aside, this event should, once again, demonstrate that computers are now playing much better chess than humans ever will. Case and point: When Viswanathan Anand faces off against Vladimir Kramnik in eleven days, it will be computer chess engines that will provide humans with the most definative analysis as to who won the championship and why. I doubt we will see any humans evaluating Rybka’s games with out the help of a chess engine.

   Speaking of Rybka… After five rounds the reigning 2007 champion is tied with Hiarcs at 4.5/5. The two leading engines have yet to play each other. Below is the cross-table and a nice game played by Rybka.

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1
0
1 Rybka       =   1 1 1 1  
2 Hiarcs       = 1     1 1 1
3 Junior       1   =   1 = 1
4 Cluster Toga = = 0     = 1      
5 Sjeng   0         = 0 1 1
6 Shredder 0   = =     = =    
7 The Baron 0     0 = =       1
8 Jonny 0 0 0   1 =        
9 Falcon 0 0 =   0         1
10 Mobile Chess   0 0   0   0   0  
    = = = = = = = = = =

 

[Event “16th World Computer Chess Championship”]
[Site “Beijing, China”]
[Date “2008.09.28”]
[Round “1”]
[White “Rybka”]
[Black “The Baron”]
[Result “1-0”]

1. e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nc4 Nxe4 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.bxc3 g6 7.d4 Bg7 8.Bd3 o-o
9.o-o Nc6 10.Qf3 Re8 11.Bf4 Bd7 12.Ne3 Na5 13.Qg3 Bc6 14.h4 Be4 15.h5 Qd7 16.Rae1 Qc6
17.h6 Bxd3 18.cxd3 Bf6 19.c4 Bxd4 20.Nd5 Rxe1 21.Rxe1 Qc5 22.Re7 Nc6 23. Rxc7 Qa5 24.Qh4 Qxa2
25.Nf6 Kh8 26.Rxf7 Qa1 27.Kh2 Bxf6 28.Qxf6 Qxf6 29.Rxf6 Kg8 30.Rxd6 Rf8 31.Kg3 a5 32.Bc1 a4
33.f3 Rd8 34.Rxd8 Nxd8 35.Kf4 Kf7 36.d4 g5 37.Ke4 Ne6 38.Kd3 Kg6 39.d5 Nc5 40.Kc3 Kxh6
41.Be3 Nd7 42.Kb4 a3 43.Kxa3 Kg6 44.Bd4 Kf7 45.Ka4 Ke8 46.g4 Nf8 47.Ka5 Kd7 48.Kb6 Kc8
49.Kc5 Kc7 50.Be5 Kd7 51.Bf6 h6 52.Bg7 Ng6 53.Bxh6 Ne5 54.Bxg5 Nxf3 1-0