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#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133

Tonight I finished a long day of teaching chess by presenting an absolutely superb mating combination played by the first World Chess Champion. A brilliant positional player, particularly in his later years, Wilhelm Steinitz rose to prominence in the mid-nineteenth century as a dangerous attacker in the romantic style of chess that had been popularisedContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133”

Chess Think

If a picture can be worth a thousand words than I suppose it’s justifiable that I used two YouTube videos to explain a single chess position. These two episodes are part of a series dedicated to describing thought processes that will lead you to making better decisions during your chess games.   Episode One andContinue reading “Chess Think”

Winning Chess Moves: Aronian vs Gelfand, 2008

Can you spot Grandmaster Levon Aronian’s winning chess move from his victory over Grandmaster Boris Gelfand at the 2008 FIDE Grand Prix in Sochi, Russia? White to move and win!

Today is Paul Keres’ Birthday

Happy birthday to Paul Keres, who was born on January 7, 1916. From 1935, when he debuted as a sensational nineteen-year-old at the Sixth World Chess Olympiad in Warsaw, Paul Keres was one of the top five players in the world before his untimely death from a heart attack on an international airplane flight fromContinue reading “Today is Paul Keres’ Birthday”

Winning Chess Moves: Mayet vs. Anderssen, 1851

You are playing the role of the quintessential Romantic, Adolf Anderssen. Karl Mayet has just played the dreadful 12. Qxe4. How does Anderssen (Black) punish his opponents in dramatic fashion?

Winning Chess Moves

Today’s position comes from round 10 of the 2019 U.S. Women’s Chess Championship. IM Anna Zatonskih (White) has just erred with 30. Qe1. How does seventeen-year-old Jennifer Yu (Black) punish Anna’s mistake to win the game and the U.S. Women’s Championship?