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Winning Chess Moves: Ehlvest vs. Kasparov, 1977

The remarkable career of Garry Kasparov makes him one of the most influential chess players of the twentieth century. Kasparov, who views chess as both a sport and and art has stated that “Chess is one of the few arts where composition takes place simultaneously with performance.” His style of neatly combining the art andContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Ehlvest vs. Kasparov, 1977”

Winning Chess Moves: Nepomniachtchi vs Karpov, 2/16/2013

We’ve already seen that Ian Nepomniachtchi won’t be intimidated by Magnus Carlsen’s talent, but will he be star struck sitting across the board from a World Champion? Based on his games against the current and previous World Champions, Nepo will be unfazed playing the holder of chess’ most coveted title. In fact, Nepomniachtchi seems toContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Nepomniachtchi vs Karpov, 2/16/2013”

Winning Chess Moves: Carlsen vs Tallaksen Ostmoe, 7/05/2005

Chess is booming in popularity and one of the reasons why is our current world champion Magnus Carlsen. Carlsen regularly produces stunning works of chess art that’ll make you want to play chess. Of course, Magnus’ primary goal in every chess game is winning. However, the very best chess players in history have a wayContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Carlsen vs Tallaksen Ostmoe, 7/05/2005”

Winning Chess Moves: Carlsen vs Harestad, 7/23/2003

Future generations of chess enthusiasts will undoubtedly treasure the early games of Magnus Carlsen in the same manner we honor Paul Morphy’s first brilliances. Of course, comparing players from different eras is difficult but there is an argument to be made that Magnus may very well be the greatest chess prodigy ever. For evidence onContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Carlsen vs Harestad, 7/23/2003”

Winning Chess Moves: Jonkman vs Nepomniachtchi, 1/18/2007

Ian Nepomniachtchi scored an impressive 10/13 in the 2007 edition of Corus Group C Tournament played in Wijk aan Zee, Netherlands from the 13th-28th of January. However, his strong performance was only good enough for a second place finish as Michal Krasenkow took first with 10.5/13. Today’s puzzle comes from round 5 where Harmen JonkmanContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Jonkman vs Nepomniachtchi, 1/18/2007”

Winning Chess Moves: Borisenko-Belova vs Nakhimovskaya, 1968

During her illustrious career, WGM Valentina M Borisenko-Belova (1/28/1920-3/6/1993) won the Women’s Soviet Championship five times (a record she shares with Nona Gaprindashvili.) Zara Nakhimovskaya was a formidable chess player who won the Latvian Chess Championship for Women four times. In our feature position, Valentina M Borisenko-Belova is playing with the white pieces against ZaraContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Borisenko-Belova vs Nakhimovskaya, 1968”

Winning Chess Moves: Mamedyarov vs Artemiev, 9/29/2021

GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov demonstrates a useful tactical motif in his round 5 victory over GM Vladislav Artemiev at the Meltwater Tour Final 2021. Can you spot white’s winning move?

Winning Chess Moves: Nakamura vs Shankland, 9/9/2021

The Champions Showdown 9LX is a rapid Fischer Random/Chess960 chess tournament that is currently taking place in Saint Louis, USA. Today’s winning chess move comes from the round 2 game between Grandmasters Hikaru Nakamura and Sam Shankland. White (Nakamura) has just recaptured with Rxe5. What is black’s (Sam Shankland’s) winning move?

Winning Chess Moves: Mieses vs Von Bardeleben, 1905

Curt von Bardeleben was a most interesting chess personality and managed to lose in some of the most beautiful ways possible. Of course, many students of chess are quite familiar with the triumph Wilhelm Steinitz played over Curt Carl Alfred von Bardeleben at Hastings in 1895, but also of note is Jacques Mieses exciting victoryContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Mieses vs Von Bardeleben, 1905”

Winning Chess Moves: Bronstein vs Geller, 1961

There have been many great chess players over the years, but only a small percentage of them manage to captivate the public imagination and receive considerable mainstream attention at any given time. David Bronstein never became a world champion, but there’s no denying that at the height of his career, he frequently captivated imaginations whileContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Bronstein vs Geller, 1961”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133

Tonight I finished a long day of teaching chess by presenting an absolutely superb mating combination played by the first World Chess Champion. A brilliant positional player, particularly in his later years, Wilhelm Steinitz rose to prominence in the mid-nineteenth century as a dangerous attacker in the romantic style of chess that had been popularisedContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 133”

Chess Think

If a picture can be worth a thousand words than I suppose it’s justifiable that I used two YouTube videos to explain a single chess position. These two episodes are part of a series dedicated to describing thought processes that will lead you to making better decisions during your chess games.   Episode One andContinue reading “Chess Think”

Winning Chess Moves: Aronian vs Gelfand, 2008

Can you spot Grandmaster Levon Aronian’s winning chess move from his victory over Grandmaster Boris Gelfand at the 2008 FIDE Grand Prix in Sochi, Russia? White to move and win!

Today is Paul Keres’ Birthday

Happy birthday to Paul Keres, who was born on January 7, 1916. From 1935, when he debuted as a sensational nineteen-year-old at the Sixth World Chess Olympiad in Warsaw, Paul Keres was one of the top five players in the world before his untimely death from a heart attack on an international airplane flight fromContinue reading “Today is Paul Keres’ Birthday”

Winning Chess Moves: Mayet vs. Anderssen, 1851

You are playing the role of the quintessential Romantic, Adolf Anderssen. Karl Mayet has just played the dreadful 12. Qxe4. How does Anderssen (Black) punish his opponents in dramatic fashion?

Winning Chess Moves

Today’s position comes from round 10 of the 2019 U.S. Women’s Chess Championship. IM Anna Zatonskih (White) has just erred with 30. Qe1. How does seventeen-year-old Jennifer Yu (Black) punish Anna’s mistake to win the game and the U.S. Women’s Championship?