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Winning Chess Moves: Nakamura vs Shankland, 9/9/2021

The Champions Showdown 9LX is a rapid Fischer Random/Chess960 chess tournament that is currently taking place in Saint Louis, USA. Today’s winning chess move comes from the round 2 game between Grandmasters Hikaru Nakamura and Sam Shankland. White (Nakamura) has just recaptured with Rxe5. What is black’s (Sam Shankland’s) winning move?

So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 42

This evening’s position is from a training game I played with a student earlier today. My young opponent just blocked my rook’s check with Bd3 so as to avoid losing his queen on d1. Does this work? Sign up for a private chess lesson with Chris Torres and maybe a position from your game willContinue reading “So I was just playing a game of #chess and then this happened! 42”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 137

In round 4 of the 2003 Corus Chess Tournament, Michal Vladimirovich Krasenkow fought admirably for 79 moves before allowing Vladimir Kramnik to end the game with a cute one-two combination. Can you spot Kramnik’s mating maneuver?

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 136

Great chess players have a way of making it look easy. However, making it look easy requires a lot of work. For instance, just to get to the feature position in today’s puzzle, Boris Spassky had to spend hours grinding out a winning position. (Not to mention the years of hard work to become anContinue reading “#Chess Position Worth Sharing 136”

Facilitative Ball Sharing in Chess

Basketball fans throw around terms like “ball hogs” and “facilitators”. A poor point guard, for example, will “hog the ball” attempting to be the star to the detriment of the team. A good point guard is a facilitator for the entire team setting the plays and passing the ball to a teammate with the bestContinue reading “Facilitative Ball Sharing in Chess”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 59

Considering that the black king is utterly alone in a forest of white pieces, this mate in two puzzle is rather tricky. Can you find the only two move checkmating line for white?

Winning Chess Moves: Mieses vs Von Bardeleben, 1905

Curt von Bardeleben was a most interesting chess personality and managed to lose in some of the most beautiful ways possible. Of course, many students of chess are quite familiar with the triumph Wilhelm Steinitz played over Curt Carl Alfred von Bardeleben at Hastings in 1895, but also of note is Jacques Mieses exciting victoryContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Mieses vs Von Bardeleben, 1905”

A California Chess Tradition Returns: The People’s Tournament

Chess players in California are flocking to Santa Clara, California to play in the upcoming People’s Tournament, Young People’s Championship and People’s Blitz. The People’s Tournament is a prestigious annual chess tournament with a storied history. This year’s event continues an important 45 year California chess tradition. Don’t miss out on your chance to competeContinue reading “A California Chess Tradition Returns: The People’s Tournament”

Chess Chat: Q&A With Michael Buss, America’s Preeminent Correspondence Chess Master

Michael Buss is currently the number one ranked correspondence chess player in the United States and further separates himself from the pack by having won the prestigious Golden Knights championship on multiple occasions. Some of his success in correspondence chess can be attributed to his “press on” attitude which he developed in his distinguished careerContinue reading “Chess Chat: Q&A With Michael Buss, America’s Preeminent Correspondence Chess Master”

Emotional Weakness in Chess

As compared to emotionless computers, human chess is inconsistent. Computers may lose at chess but they don’t have “bad days” where their performance is inexplicably poor. Emotional thinking, therefore, appears to present a weakness for decision making in humans. Obviously, we are biological creatures and emotions have by and large served the human race wellContinue reading “Emotional Weakness in Chess”

All Chess Masters Are Stoic

Not all stoics are chess players, but all chess masters are stoic. Knights who sacrifice themselves, contemplating truth, baring their brains among the scholars of war. Burning neurons like Tal’s cigarettes. Quiet! Listen to the whispering eyes in the room evaluate them. Their positions busting along with their hearts. Watch them! Staring with disillusion atContinue reading “All Chess Masters Are Stoic”

Winning Chess Moves: Bronstein vs Geller, 1961

There have been many great chess players over the years, but only a small percentage of them manage to captivate the public imagination and receive considerable mainstream attention at any given time. David Bronstein never became a world champion, but there’s no denying that at the height of his career, he frequently captivated imaginations whileContinue reading “Winning Chess Moves: Bronstein vs Geller, 1961”

Joseph Norman Cotter (June 25, 1929 – May 23, 2021)

It is with great sadness that I am sharing the news that Joseph Norman Cotter passed away on May 23 at the age of 91. Mr. Cotter was a chess player, educator and friend whom I met during our shared adventures in the 2006 USCF Golden Knights correspondence chess tournament. During our game, Norman spokeContinue reading “Joseph Norman Cotter (June 25, 1929 – May 23, 2021)”

Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58

When you think about it, our whole life is about solving puzzles. Chess problems are similar to life problems in that solving the puzzle requires careful thought and that through practice, we can improve our ability to quickly find the best solution. So enjoy our daily chess puzzles and smile knowing that by doing soContinue reading “Betcha Can’t Solve This #Chess Puzzle! 58”

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 135

Emmanuel Lasker offered the famous advice, “When you see a good move, look for a better one.” Today’s position easily lends itself to this exercise in chess thought. First, find the obvious good move. Then, try and find the best continuation.

#Chess Position Worth Sharing 134

White to move and mate in 5 (from Yuri Averbakh vs. Alexander Kazimirovich Tolush, 1963).

GM Yuri Averbakh is Checkmating Covid

At age 99, Yuri Averbakh has spent the better part of of his life checkmating opponents but off the board, it appears that he used his famous chess stubbornness to checkmate COVID.

Tournament Report for The Eade Foundation’s Spring Scholastic Chess Classic

On May 22, The Eade Foundation Spring Scholastic Chess Classic took place online. This prestigious event attracted many of the top youth chess players from around the United States and Canada. The tournament which was organized by Chris Torres of https://dailychessmusings.com and directed by Jay Stallings of https://chesshootz.com was a well-run 5 round rapid playContinue reading “Tournament Report for The Eade Foundation’s Spring Scholastic Chess Classic”

Learning to Laugh at your Worst Chess Mistakes

Chess is a demanding game. For many of us, the game represents a never-ending sequence of challenges. We grow fixated on losses, obsessing over every imperfection in our play, agonizing about the missed opportunities and how we destroyed our rating. In this way, we hold ourselves to unrealistic, if not humanly impossible, expectations. Give yourselfContinue reading “Learning to Laugh at your Worst Chess Mistakes”